Competitive Outrage

I haven’t commented on the outrage of the week, the killing of Zimbabwe’s “most beloved lion,” Cecil, by a big game hunting dentist from Minnesota named Walter Palmer.

By the time I was aware of the Cecil killing, the internet outrage was far more than anything I could come up with, so I passed even tweeting about it. Besides, the only thing I could think of to say that I hadn’t seen before was how white the dentist’s teeth were — obviously, a Photoshop job.

The competitive nature of internet outrage is fascinating.

Continue reading Competitive Outrage

Why Google+ Failed: It Was a Pigpen Product, Not a Lucy Product

lucygoogle-20101112-053016pigpengoogle-20101112-053824Because I’ve blogged a rather long time, I now have the privilege to point back to things written long ago (as history is so prone to repeat itself).

For instance, five years ago, I shared my theory that the products Google constantly releases fall into two categories: the “Lucy Google” product or the “Pigpen Google” product.

I point to that earlier post because of the failure of Google+ as a product (but a failure that contains many products that IMHO, once freed from the social networking shackles of Google+ will be successful),

Continue reading Why Google+ Failed: It Was a Pigpen Product, Not a Lucy Product

Heritage of Convenience

A lot has changed during the two weeks since I posted my view of the Confederate flag being used by Southern state  governments in a way that suggests the people of that state are honoring some type of mythological concept of heritage . If you are among the 12 people who read this blog, I don’t need to catch you up.

South Carolina did the right thing. Other states should follow. And, members of the U.S. House of Representatives should also.


From the Washington Post story, “As S.C. prepares to lower battle flag, Boehner calls for Confederate review,” comes this quote that is extraordinary in its irony or ignorance, or both.

Southern Republicans said that their Democratic colleagues did not understand that they were trying to pay tribute to fallen Confederate soldiers who were not plantation owners. “The majority of people that actually died in the Civil War on the Confederate side didn’t own slaves. These were people that were fighting for their states, and, you know, I don’t think they even had any thoughts about slavery,” said Rep. Lynn A. Westmoreland (R-Ga.). He rejected the position of Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a leader in the civil rights movement, who called the flag a symbol of oppression. “Does he understand where I’m coming from?” Westmoreland said. “Well, if I believe it comes from heritage, does he understand where I’m coming from?”

Perhaps I am cursed by a lifetime of reading books about history, many of them regarding the context and battles of the Civil War.

Continue reading Heritage of Convenience