When disaster strikes “someplace else,” first send money (continued)

I’ve re-run the following post several times. It’s about what the experts tell us we should do when a major disaster strikes ‘someplace else.’ I make it a point to say “someplace else,” as I know when disaster strikes “someplace near,” you’ll know what to do.

My thoughts go out to those who are impacted by the Texas/Oklahoma floods.


Over the years, I have written about many natural disasters and the human toll they’ve taken. I believe social media, writ large, make such events more personal to us all — a shared phenomena, even for those of us not on the scene.

Continue reading When disaster strikes “someplace else,” first send money (continued)

Why I Like Slack

A few days ago, Dave Winer asked the question to those who follow him on Twitter and Facebook, “Why do people like Slack?” Because Dave rarely asks questions for which I have an answer (I know nothing about “nodes”), I thought I’d jump on this one, as Hammock Inc. has been using Slack since last year.

So I started to answer with a comment on Facebook, but within a sentence I knew this would grow into a post.

First, some context

Continue reading Why I Like Slack

PacMan Eats Up Amazon’s Home Page

Earlier this year, I noted a new design of Wired.com that supports “takeover” ads. These are not pop-over or pop-up ads that you can click an “x” to remove. These are ads that are actually a part of the background or are, in some graphical and often animated way, an actual element of the page.

Today, I thought I saw Amazon come as close as I’ve seen it come to promoting a product using a takeover approach (that wasn’t a letter from Jeff Bezzos). However, upon looking at it more closely, I realized it was a standard size Amazon uses — a “slider” approach to promoting various products that someone viewing the site on a desktop screen will see. (I use lots of smaller screens, so seeing something on a big screen jumps out.)

2010 Google Doodle
2010 Google Doodle

Later: No wait. More than a takeover ad, this now reminds me of a Google Doodle from five years ago (left).

 

The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

I’m reading (and listening to) David McCullough’s wonderful new book, The Wright Brothers.

This isn’t a review, as I’ve only read about one-third of the book. But I’ve read enough to know that anyone who has ever has faced adversity and challenge and ridicule will recognize something familiar in the story. These brothers were from Dayton, Ohio, and funded the venture themselves. And besides, everyone know that no one would ever fly. Why? Because all of the big thinkers of the day said so.

Continue reading The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

Google Maps Lakeside View



In Nashville, a city that is in the midst of an unprecedented building boom, a prime piece of property has not participated in the boom. Instead, it became first, a giant hole and then, one of the most expensive lakes a person can imagine. However, Google Maps isn’t a person and it had no problem imagining it. Google Maps has spent the past several years codifying the creation of the giant lake on West End Avenue.

Continue reading Google Maps Lakeside View