Sub-par blogging

Sub-par blogging: The annonymous vaporzine scout couldn’t believe I didn’t post a link to the mediapost.com’s story about the vaporzine Golf Connoisseur.

I apologize. I ignored the story as I thought I’d blogged it earlier. I confess: there’s typically a new golf magazine announcement in my in-box every week and I keep getting confused.

Again, I’m sorry, Primarily, because today’s story is one of the funniest articles I’ve read in a long time.

Quote:

The magazine will only be mailed out to those with the highest incomes, and lower-income readers will actually be discouraged from subscribing by enforcing a prohibitive price on those with lighter wallets. “Instead of, ‘Would you like to receive this magazine?’ It’s almost like, ‘Can you qualify to receive the magazine?,” says Capell, who is the editor of the respected Capell’s Circulation Report. “I’m not sure it has been [done before].”…”We are trying to produce the highest demographics in America,” says Capell.

What is it with people? A few weeks ago, I blogged (in secret white type) about American Express’ magazine for Black Card holders who spend over $250,000 on their Amex each year (can you get a higher demographics than that?) . Is the nouveau niche that big?

Side note: Last week I heard a new (to me, at least) marketing buzzword: “mass affluent marketing.” It’s a term to describe a marketing approach that targets those who want to be “affluent” but may not necessarily have the necessary net worth. Perhaps nouveau niche magazines are filled with mass affluent advertising. I admit: I have no idea.

  • Hudge

    >Last week I heard a new (to me, at least) marketing buzzword: “mass affluent marketing.” It’s a term to describe a marketing approach that targets those who want to be “affluent” but may not necessarily have the necessary net worth.

    This sounds suspiciously like people who max out their credit cards and will still be paying on today’s debt when Jenna Bush’s granddaughter becomes president.