America, **** Yeah

America, * * * * Yeah: Raymond Snoddy (I know this sounds like it’s from The Onion, but I can’t make this up), writing for the UK website, MediaBulletin, suggests American brand managers should fear a Bush victory because the USA needs a “rebrand.”


“The Pugh ([sic] note: I guess that’s the way they spell “Pew” in the UK) Global Attitude survey, which closely monitors such things, shows marked declines in positive attitudes toward the US. The hostility, so far at least, is mainly aimed at Bush and his government rather than US brands. But is this about to change?”

Snoddy posits that most Americans don’t realize (although, he spells it realise) just how much the rest of the world, “Europeans in particular,” think “Bush appears plain stupid.” (I suppose it’s because we’re cut off from all international news sources.) Snoddy’s column is a stunning misunderstanding of the attitudes of Americans who live at least 100 miles inland from the Pacific or Atlantic oceans (this rule doesn’t apply to the Gulf of Mexico). Do you have any idea, Mr Snoddy, how “fly-over” Americans — even many who lean towards Kerry — will respond if they think their vote is about (rather than choosing a leader) whether or not Europeans will like them better?

As much as I hate commercial country music, reading something like this makes me want to turn-up the speakers on some Toby Keith music. Or, better yet, it removes all satire from this instant (but explicit) classic from the movie, Team America, which is this post’s bumper music.

Update: Those silly American media buyers obvioiusly haven’t read Snoddy’s column yet, as is reporting an uptick in advertising demand from planners “who support Bush.”


Interestingly, demand for media time and space appears to be strongest among supporters of the Bush/Cheney ticket vs. the Kerry/Edwards ticket. Forty-seven percent of Bush’s supporters said their demand for all media has improved relative to a year ago, while only 39 percent of Kerry’s supporters felt that way. Kerry’s supporters, however, had a far more stable view, with 57 percent saying their demand remained the same vs. 49 percent of Bush supporters. Only 4 percent of supporters of both tickets said demand had diminished.

It’s like I’ve always said, if you find there are media planners with hope and there are media planner with fear, go with the media planners with hope.


  • lcreekmo

    Well I’m going to argue here that both the Europeans and the flyovers are wrong.

    Bush is not stupid. I think that the Europeans don’t get the middle-American, good-ole-boy persona at all, whether it’s presented to them in the person of a U.S. president or a random tourist or the generic image of an American consumer.

    And, although we are probably not the only country that seems to have mass numbers of people who don’t care what the world thinks of what we do, we do seem to specialize in being so proud of it. It doesn’t make us the best neighbor or the best example for others, and it makes it harder to argue when folks like Vladimir Putin scrap almost all vestiges of democracy in their country. I don’t think it’s negative to be a world citizen. We can do that AND take care of our own national interests too.