Really something swell

Really something swell: Today, (via Steve Rubel) a Reuters article surveys
how news organizations are hopping (hoping?) on board the RSS train. And, from a
couple of days ago (I’ve been traveling), VC-blogger Kevin Law looks at a range of business possibilities related to RSS.

personal observation: When RSS is compared to “push” technology, it
makes me cringe, as my recollections of “push” are all bad. I recall
using “Pointcast” for about a week and getting rid of it because it
would take over my computer whenever it started downloading something.

the word “push” to describe RSS is an incorrect metaphor (while it may, in a technical sense, be correct) as the user is
in complete control of what he or she receives. “Push” implies to the
publishing community the opportunity to blast out content in yet
another way. However, with my three-years of constant use of RSS, I
view it more as a means to “invite” and “control” publishers (citizen
publishers and professional publishers, alike); and not at all having
anything to do with having something “pushed” onto me.

If you don’t know what RSS is all about, but you think “Pointcast” when
you hear the word “push,” then don’t make the mistake of thinking RSS
is anything like Pointcast. If you’re a publisher and you want to turn
RSS into Pointcast, well, try something else.

  • swissfondue

    I describe RSS as an easy way to be notified when information which interests you is available on the web.

    I try to avoid the word “subscription” as it often has the connotation of “an obligation”, usually of a financial type. And it brings up nightmares of the hassle of unsubscribing.

  • Matt

    I call it “pull” tech intead of push. Seems to work for a lot of people.