An exception

An exception: Since I know that this blog has at least one
reader who I have told for 14 years not to use such language, I rarely
use words like “dumb ass.” But that’s the most appropriate word I can
think of about someone who starts a weblog (sorry, like his, my
out-bound linking tool doesn’t seem to want to point in that direction)
and posts a half-dozen of the longest, most boring posts ever recorded,
has no out-bound links or blogroll, and then gets an op-ed piece published
with the lede, “Blogging, I’ve discovered, is about as stimulating as
singing to my refrigerator. The echo of my words dissolves quickly into
silence. It may be that these words simply bore anyone dropping by. But
I suspect the lack of traffic to my new blog has more to do with the
fact that there are now millions of bloggers out there, pouring their
hearts out … for the most part to themselves.” No, Mr. Larson. You
were right the first time: Your words simply bore anyone dropping by.As
for others who wish to learn how to make their weblogs interesting.
Check out Mr. Larson’s and then go look inside your refrigerator.
You’ll get better ideas by looking in your refrigerator.

(A long time ago, Jeff Jarvis said I “disagreed, agreeably.” Guess I’ve blown that.)

  • Hudge

    Do I detect a maxim?: If you don’t think you have anything worthwhile to blog, don’t blog it.

  • rex

    No. I break that maxim all day long. The maxim is, if your ego can’t handle only 7 people ever reading your blog, then don’t blog. I think David Weinberger said (or quoted someone else), “In the future, everyone will be famous to 15 people.” Blogging is the perfect 15-reader medium.

  • Hudge

    I’m not sure I want even 7 people to read my blog, so I will adhere to my maxim.