How will magazines survive the Internet?

How will magazines survive the Internet? I guess I should point to this
transcript of a panel discussion on the topic. However, I’m in the
midst of an interview on the same topic and so I’ve had the weekend to
think about why I think it’s a ridiculous question: How will magazines
survive the Internet?

Fortunately, my interviewer is allowing me to start with the obvious
premise that the print format we now call “a magazine” is going to be
around for, well, until Wal-mart decides it doesn’t want them to be
published anymore. (Note: that was a joke.)

Ironic point by a Google employee

Ironic point by a Google employee: I don’t know which is more ironic. A Google employee using a Microsoft’s employee’s weblog to make the point about Autolink…or the Google employee’s point:

“…if you don’t like what the toolbar does…do not use it. You have a choice.”

The irony is that if publishers of websites (including bloggers) don’t like what the toolbar does to their content, they still have to use it…they have no choice (or, at least not one that Google provides.) If Google wants to do the right thing, they can start with some opt-out assistance for publishers along the lines of what they provide people who don’t want their residential phone numbers to show up on Google.

How magazines get started by big publishing companies

How magazines get started by big publishing companies: When I read this item in the NY Times about Cookie, a vaporzine that Fairchild will launch in November, I thought to myself, gee, that sounds familiar. And then I remembered, it sounds like the original “how magazines get started (continued)” magazine. (Note: I now usually just post those “how magazines get started links” on my link blog, deli.cio.us/rexblog.)