Hyper-local blogging

Hyper-local emergency/crisis blogging – be prepared: In times of local crisis, the importance of having an active blogging community becomes very apparent. There are so many people outside an area who are desperately seeking information — any information — from the ground, so even if power and web-access is out in a city, the information being shared is much needed. (One of the reasons I blog hurricanes is that all of my family (including inlaws) live within one-mile of the Florida or Alabama gulf coasts.) In addition to the standard “meet-ups” that are popular among bloggers here in Nashville and other cities, I suggest that some emergency preparation might be a good thing for bloggers to discuss before the need arises. I’d be happy to point to any examples or list of emergency-blog planning suggestions that exist. Feel free to e-mail me some, or add to the comments below. And I’d be happy to assist in helping Nashville bloggers organize for such an effort.

Update: Josh Hallett makes a good point. It’s time for local public information officers to get to know their hometown bloggers.

Update II: Jeff Jarvis is testing blogging via Treo so he can be ready to blog anytime (I recall he used to blog from church). In Josh’s post linked to above, he notes his Blackberry has continued to work when all else failed.

  • Hudge

    Rexblog said: ” In times of local crisis, the importance of having an active blogging community becomes very apparent. There are so many people outside an area who are desperately seeking information — any information — from the ground, so even if power and web-access is out in a city, the information being shared is much needed.”

    Blogs can serve as a new kind of HAM radio, as long as you can figure a way to keep getting juice to run whatever you use.

  • Ex-Mississippian

    A good place to start is working with the Amateur Radio community. For more years than I recall, there has been “Field Day” in preparation for emergency needs. With the advent of cell phones and bloggers, the technology may have changed but the need and the preparations have not.

  • Susan Kitchens

    I took a printout of your post–and one of Josh Hallet’s post– with me to the city council meeting tonight. (first time I’ve attended one of these things in 16 years of living here.) Inquired about my city’s disaster plans. Offered my services as a volunteer blogger. Described hyper-local news, gave an example with what I did during the San Bernardino mountain fires.

    Thanks for your post and for calling attention to this. It’s already going into new directions.

  • Sany

    Your blog is realy very interesting.