What exactly is a blog supposed to win?

What exactly is a blog supposed to win? Seth Godin says, “Blogs with restraint, selectivity, cogency and brevity (okay, that’s a long way of saying “making every word count”) will use attention more efficiently and ought to win.”

I guess because Seth is a creative, successful and sought-after author/speaker/marketing guru, he sees blogging through another prism than I see blogging. For example, I don’t understand exactly what is the competition that showing restraint, etc., is supposed to help a blogger win?

I’ll go back to my telephone metaphor. Having a blog is like having a telephone. It merely gives one the ability to connect to a network: a voice in a conversation. Using all the A-List, best-seller, share-of-market, loyalty-of-readership metaphors is perhaps appropriate if one views their weblog as part of some sort of marketing plan.

Perhaps if one views a blog as part of an ad campaign-like strategy, one can win or lose something by blogging “wrong.” If one sees blogging as a competition, I guess one can win — or lose.

If that’s the case, I guess you can see more bloggers blogging (in Seth’s words), as “a noisy tragedy.” (A tragedy? Is someone dying here? Is having people remove you from their RSS feed because you’re blogging too much a tragedy? I guess Seth’s threshold of tragedy is a bit lower than mine.)

So, I’ll go back to my first rule of blogging: There are no rules.

If you want to blog without restraint, have at it. Be random. Be irrelevant. Be Tolstoyan (or, Jarvisian) and say in 30 words what you could in three.

And while you’re at it, be young, be foolish, but be happy.

Worrying about “winning” at blogging is the real tragedy.

Update: Scott Karp: “As for Seth, well, that was so 1.0.”

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  • Larry Hendrick


    And while you’re at it, be young, be foolish, but be happy.
    Worrying about “winning” at blogging is the real tragedy.

    hooray for for you Rex! Just a little sanity into the mix. Thank you.

  • Seth Finkelstein

    It’s not “a voice in a conversation”

    A more appropriate metaphor is “a ticket in the lottery”.