The verb Pacman

I’ve tried to eschew the whole Michael Vick thing as I find the topic of dog-fighting disgusting. However, as the NFL-precedent that appears to be coming into play is a topic I’ve touched on during the past three falls (we’re moving in that direction, folks), I decided to point to this NY Times article about Vick and comment on the following sentence from it:

“The league has held off disciplining Vick in part because he does not have a lengthy history of legal trouble since entering the NFL, as players like Pacman Jones did when they were suspended.”

I believe we should go ahead and declare the word “Pacman” to be a verb, as in, “the NFL should Pacman him — suspend him until the matter works its way through the court. If that takes six months, then Pacman them for six months. After the courts have their say, then the NFL can tack on any additional league penalties it wants.”

The phrase “Michael Vick does not have a lengthy history of legal trouble” can be easily translated: “Michael Vick has never been caught before.” To believe otherwise would require the suspension of ones common sense in knowing dog-fighting at the level to which Vick was involved is not something that suddenly just happens.

  • Hudge

    This could be a new cottage industry – the verbification of the infamous, notorious or merely highly obnoxious.

    As in, “She had such promise, but boy did she Lohan later on.”

    Or, “Yeah, he was guilty of something, but they Scootered him.”

    Fortunately, one can already Potter off into the sunset…