Peter Carlson sums up the past 12 years of magazines

If you haven’t been keeping up with magazines for the past decade, Peter Carlson’s Washington Post column today is the equivalent to one of those 30-second introductions to an episode of a TV drama series that starts out, “Recently, on Lost…”

The Important Part: Today, the Washington Post’s Peter Carlson says goodbye to his column, "The Magazine Reader." If you haven’t been keeping up with magazines for the past decade, Carlson’s column today is the equivalent of one of those 30-second introductions at the beginning of an episode of a TV drama series that starts, "Recently, on Lost…"

The Take-Away Quote:

"In the magazine business, as in nature, life is a Darwinian struggle that is frequently nasty, brutish and short. Every year, more than 500 magazines are born and nearly as many die. During the past 12 years, Life died. So did Civilization, My Generation, Spy, George, Talk, Brill’s Content, Punk Planet, Doubletake and Mademoiselle, plus Lingua Franca, a smart, funny magazine about academia, Gadfly, a lively pop culture magazine and recently, the music magazines Harp and No Depression. Replacing the dead on newsstands was a crop of newborns — Maxim, Portfolio, Real Simple, the Week, Blender, the American Conservative, Hallmark, Found, Mental Floss and a fine literary mag called the Believer. Meanwhile, the Oxford American, a magazine of Southern culture, died and was reborn. And Radar, a snarky pop culture mag, died, was reborn, died again and was reborn yet again. As of last night, it was still alive, but stay tuned."

Personal observation: Thanks, Peter. Start blogging.

  • Carol

    I just now asked for the same in an email to him. He is switching to an exciting new genre with a book coming out in the spring.

    “–“K Blows Top” a serious non-fiction comedy about Niktia Khrushchev’s bizarre
    1959 trip across the USA.”

    I can’t wait.