The NYTimes.com’s “website of record” features

With this innovative video/transcript archival feature chronicling last night’s Veep debate (and last week’s first debate), the New York Times is displaying what a news website of record should be: The definitive spot where news-related media is collected, curated, analyzed and then organized in various ways that allow individuals to search and easily find everything they need to make up their own minds. For more of their interactive campaign features, visit here.

Sidenotes: Information design wonks will love the elegance of the interface of the video archive — the timeline especially. And on the business side, note that the archive has a single sponsor who gets lots of visibility thanks to the lack of noise on the page.

(via: waxy.org/links)

The economy is losing jobs, but Apple still has Jobs

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Poor Steve Jobs is like the U.S. economy, rumors of his demise keep being greatly exaggerated.

A month ago, Bloomberg (the news service, not the mayor) mistakenly published his obituary and this morning, a “citizen journalist” on CNN’s iReport.com, posted a false report that Steve Jobs had a heart attack.

Jobs has been puny-looking and mysterious about his health recently, so there was enough truthiness in both the obit appearance and the fake rumor to make Apple shares fall — something they’ve been doing a lot of recently.

Or perhaps, it was the report this morning that jobs (the kind people are paid for) are what is having a heart attack is what made the stock slump.

Whatever, I think we all need to declare Steve Jobs’ health rumors a no-fly zone. If you see a report related to it, turn off your computer and TV for 30 minutes before reacting.

Sidenote: There is actually a name for a high profile — and harmful — malicious use of a user-contributed platform. It’s called a Seigenthaler incident and it refers to a series of events that began in May, 2005, involving a hoax article on Wikipedia. That unfortunate event led to lots of analysis and to tightening the requirements for individuals who edit Wikipedia. I feel certain today’s hack will lead to some re-thinking of such policies at iReport.com & CNN, as well.