Online advertising that works (and it’s not search)

As I’ve noted before, while Apple spends a small percentage (about 10% in 2007 – sub. required) of its advertising budget online (a likely reason being they get more visits to Apple.com than most advertising-supported sites), when they do advertise online, they provide a masters class on what “brand advertising” can be when you think just a little outside the conventional banner ad box. My long version of this was written when Apple convinced WSJ.com and NYT.com to allow them to co-opt the front pages of those sites. Today, I’ll simply embed a short screencast of what greeted me when I went to check out some scores on NFL.com: A web version of the ads that are running near continuously today during TV coverage of NFL games. (For those who care about such design and production subtleties, notice how the video appears to pierce the upper limits of the “banner” and slightly overlaps the navigation bar. If, during the playing of the video, you move your cursor over the nav-bar, the video will instantly conform to the banner parameter. It’s the little things that impress me.):

Time out for a little Jung fun

According to a fun little web tool called Typealyzer, this blog (not me, but the blog) belongs to a group called, “The Thinkers.”

Quote:

“(Thinker blogs) are especialy attuned to difficult creative and intellectual challenges and always look for something more complex to dig into. They are great at finding subtle connections between things and imagine far-reaching implications. They enjoy working with complex things using a lot of concepts and imaginative models of reality. Since they are not very good at seeing and understanding the needs of other people, they might come across as arrogant, impatient and insensitive to people that need some time to understand what they are talking about.”

I think I would like that description if one of my intentions with it were not trying to help people understand what I am talking about.

(via: Doc Searls who writes about Typealyzer and other “typology” tests here.)