The AP is doing what?

According to this article on NYTimes.com, the Associated Press is “taking aim at major search engines like Google, Yahoo and their competitors” by demanding that Web sites obtain permission to use the work of The A.P. or its member newspapers.” However, I’ve tried reading the story a couple of times and I can’t figure out how this has anything to do with Google or Yahoo!. Maybe I just don’t get it.

Quote:

Associated Press executives said the policy was aimed at major search engines like Google, Yahoo and their competitors, and also at news aggregators like the Huffington Post, as well as companies that sell packaged news services. They said they do not want to stop the appearance of articles around the Web, but to exercise some control over it and to profit from it. The A.P. also said it is developing a system to track news articles online and determine whether they were used legally.

Again. I’m sorry. I must not be following something.

How is this targeting Google? Google already pays AP to license and display content from the news service. And so does Yahoo!

So how is it that Google and Yahoo! are the target of this action if they are licensing content from AP?

Surely they are not suggesting that Google stop driving traffic to AP member sites?

Actually, I asked that rhetorically. I am never shocked by anything AP does.

  • Hi Rex,

    It sounds like they are trying to sculpt the traffic so that the sites that get crawled by search engines (and thus benefit from the traffic) are the ones that have paid for the license to redistribute on the web.

  • @Ian. Perhaps you are correct. But I still don’t understand how that can be characterized by the New York Times as “taking aim” at Google, Yahoo! et al. Do you think AP is thinking they can provide Google a list of sites it shouldn’t index? I can think of others who would like to provide other such lists to Google because they don’t approve of the content on those sites. Perhaps we need a Constitutional amendment to protect the Freedom of Search.

  • Hudge