Off-topic: Daughter update

Several people have emailed me with kind comments about a series of tweets I posted Monday night regarding an accident my daughter was involved in. Taking advantage of the beautiful weather in New York City, she decided to leave her typical treadmill workout venue and run along the wonderful Hudson River Greenway. (If you are familiar with the Greenway, her route was one she and I have run together a couple of times, starting roughly at Stuyvesant High School with a turn-around at about 14th Street.)

Right after her turn, a bicyclist knocked her down while passing from behind. Rather than stop to see if she needed help, he continued his high-speed ride. If he had stopped, he would have realized that the fall resulted in a broken collarbone. Thanks to a New York City park employee who was maintaining some of the many garden spots along the greenway, she was transported back to where she works and then to a nearby emergency room.

For those who have asked, she’s recuperating well. My wife flew up early the next morning (yesterday) to provide our daughter the wonderful and mysterious things that moms can provide their children whenever, no matter their age, they fall down and hurt themselves.

I’ll add that even before my wife got on a plane at six a.m., a supportive circle of my daughter’s friends and co-workers were already mobilizing to help her — and several of my friends and professional colleagues who live in New York, who follow my Tweet stream, were quick to reach out. (Yet another reason to use Twitter, even though you’ll never understand it.)

Despite a great deal of pain and the need to spend a couple of months in a brace, my daughter (whose middle name could be Resilient) is already back working — at least doing those things she can do from her apartment. (“I can use my computer,” she says, “as long as I don’t have to lift my arm”).

Again, thank you to all who have communicated your concern.

Sidenote:

The Greenway, if you haven’t enjoyed it already, is a remarkable treasure the City of New York has created. The entire Manhattan Waterfront Greenway is 32-miles of linear park space that is an amazing retro-fitted masterpiece of urban design. Much of it has separate lanes for pedestrians and bicyclists. However, if you keep up with local news that concerns Manhattanites, you may have heard there’s an explosion in the number of people who are biking in the city. As a bicyclist, myself, I think this wonderful.

However, I also know that, in much the same way bicyclists experience the reckless disregard of cycling by a minority of obnoxious car drivers, there are pedestrians who are beginning to feel the same way about the small percentage of bicyclists who treat pedestrians with similar disregard.

My daughter doesn’t want to be a part of any bicyclist vs. pedestrian debate — she’s glad so many people are biking in NYC. However, the experience has reminded me that bicyclists who have fought very hard to share the road with automobiles, need to follow the rules of law and common-sense.

And there’s one particular bicyclist who needs to be taught that lesson with a baseball bat.

(Oops, the dad in me just slipped out.)

  • Jlavey

    Goldman will have the offending guy disappear, or at least brought up on securities violations.

  • As a former runner who frequented Warner Park, I can’t tell you how many times cyclists came whizzing by, from behind, without observing the safety etiquette of a shout-out. Very dangerous.

  • Kim, I both biked and ran the park for a few years when I participated in some triathlons (note, I didn’t say “competed in,” as completion was my only goal). For the most part, I found the bicyclists were courteous and gave plenty of warning when coming up on another cyclist or runner — “On your left” is how I learned to do it. But on those times when, like you, I experienced a bicyclist blow past with no announcement, I wanted to throw something. Having been on a bike in such a situation, I know that the cyclist could probably see they have the room to easily pass, therefore they chose not to say anything — but the sensation such speed gives to the runner is very unsettling, and seems closer than it may even be. There are also certain conditions related to heat and wind which prevent a runner from hearing the sound of a bike until it’s right on them (the bike isn’t really traveling at the speed of sound — it just seems that way due to the humidity and wind’s effect on the sound). Bottomline: Those places where bicyclists and runners share the same lanes require the bicyclist to have the courtesy towards pedestrians that they expect from drivers. (As I’ve had cars and trucks try intentionally to run me off the road while bicycling, I’ll stop there.)

  • I hope she is still on the mend. Please give “Anchor” our love. Maybe there’s a sign to be designed for walkers/runners to have on their backs … “If you pass me let me know” OR “If startled will use Taser!”