What I Favor vs. What Twitter Likes

I used to write a lot about Twitter. For example, here is a collection of 10,000+ words I wrote in a series of blog posts called “Thoughts on Twitter.” In brief, all those words say that Twitter was (they were written years ago) great because no two people use it the same way. And anyone who tried to explain how one was supposed to use Twitter broke the first rule of Twitter: You can’t make up rules for how others use Twitter. Back then, Twitter was a feature of a failed product (Odeo) that lived on past the product failure to become an  easy  means to send out a group text message. Back then, the cool things about Twitter were being created by its users. [Most obvious example: @ChrisMesinna  (not the actor) who is responsible for the #hashtag.]

Rather than repeat any more of those 10,000 words, I’ll stop there and say, Twitter is best when you realize it now belongs to someone else, someone who tomorrow could decide that the #hashtag should be a ~tilde or the star should become a heart.

Twitter is now like professional football.  Imagine if all football was eight years ago was (hash)tag football played in a parking lot and today it had to be the NFL, a $billion business that has to make money from huge advertisers and fans who just want to see the game and buy a hot dog.

People say, “professional sports are no longer about the game, they are just part of the entertainment business.” But people who are really fans of a specific sport or team can find a way to peer through the hype and corporate greed and recognize that somewhere buried in all that crap, the game still exists.

Bottomline: Like it, or favorite it, Twitter belongs to the people who own it, not the people who use it. The people who run it will keep trying to “fix” it so the owners will like it. The people who use it will put up with all those useless “fixes” if they can recognize that it’s still tag football under all that crap. If they don’t see the game, they’ll use it to promote what they are doing somewhere else that’s more fun.