A Few of the Thousand New Words That Made it Into the Dictionary

Words like photo bomb have made it into the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Merriam-Webster.com has added 1,000 new words to its online dictionary.

I was familiar with the most of the tech, web culture and political ones. Completely blank on the science ones. Didn’t know that wayback machine has a meaning other than the one found at archive.org. But buried deep in the list, I knew the meaning of ginger.

Completely blank on the science ones.

Ginger, of course.

Didn’t know that “wayback machine” has a meaning other than the one found at archive.org.

But buried deep in the list, I knew the meaning of ginger (right).

Here is a sampling of the new words (links go to Merriam-Webster.com meanings).

Technology and web culture

net neutrality
abandonware
botnet
binge-watch
photobomb
ghost
NSFW
listicles
humblebrags

Sports

airball
up-fake
five-hole

Medicine

supercentenarian
EpiPen
urgent care

Science

CRISPR
phytoremediation
microbiome
Prosopagnosia

Cooking and food

arancini
EVOO
macaron
santoku
chef’s knife
artisanal (expanded entry)

Politics

SCOTUS
FLOTUS
town hall
truther

Familiar words combined that form new words

face-palm
food insecure
geek out
ride shotgun
side-eye
throw shade
train wreck
walk back (an opinion)
weak sauce

More examples of new meanings for old word combinations

Yowza!
bokeh
elderflower
fast fashion
first world problem
ginger
microaggression
mumblecore
pareidolia
ping
safe space
wayback
wayback machine
woo-woo

The Optimization of ‘Huh?’

A picture I took recently in a Vermont general store. The boxes orchestrated my optimal interactions.

A national organization comprised of marketing executives just sent me and thousands more (I guess) an email inviting me to watch an online presentation they are hosting.

The title of the presentation starts:

“Orchestrating Optimal Interactions…”

There were lots more words in the presentation title, but I couldn’t make it past those first three.

Shouldn’t marketing executives speak English (or whatever their native tongue might be)?

I suggest they rename the presentation, “How to sell stuff.”

The Best Thing About Blogging

There are many great things about having a personal blog and consistently posting to it. And none of the great things are about trying to be a “thought leader” or personal brand. After blogging (more-or-less consistently) for 17 years, I’ve discovered that much of what I write is like jotting down a note to the future me.

RexBlog on Jan. 9, 2007

Like today. Ten years ago today, I was in San Francisco. I was on about the 20th row when Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone. Because I blog, I can go back and read what I said that day and said a few days afterward.

In the past decade, I’ve blogged tens of thousands of words about Apple products.

But there’s something great about reading what you first thought about something that later turned out to be more (or less) significant.

It makes you feel like you were clueless…or insightful. But that you had any opinion at all makes you feel connected to an event in some way.

The headline of the post where I wrote my response is, “The least impressive thing about the iPhone is that it’s a phone.”

Ten years later, I think I nailed it.

What else happened on this day, ten years ago.

Looking at other posts of the day, I see that MyBlogLog.com was going to be purchased by Yahoo. Later, that would be as disastrous as most Yahoo acquisitions were.

AppleTV was released.

While I didn’t blog about it, ten years ago today was the first time I ever used Twitter. I had set up an account a few months earlier (in the year 2006), but MacWorld was the first time I used it. Why? The media center (I had press credentials thanks to a friend in high places), encouraged reporters to follow their posts to Twitter (“tweets” didn’t exist yet) to learn about changes in the MacWorld schedule or other updates. This was back when it was far easier to understand what Twitter was (a group text messaging thingee) than it is today. (However, for months, I continued to think it was a method for PR people to distribute text messages.)

‘I Want to Know’ Moments & ‘I Want to Buy’ Moments

On Hammock’s Idea Blog, we’re discussing the two types of customer moments that marketers should prepare for by developing “content assets.” It’s similar to a concept in Hammock’s eBook Content Along the Customer Journey. Rather than thinking that marketing with content is a series of posts, tweets, likes, consider all the way content assests can be developed to reach customers at those times they want the information you can provide.

Google calls them:

1. I want to buy moments.
2. I want to know moments.

“I want to buy moments” are those situations where consumers have seen a TV ad or are trying to find the closest restaurant or drugstore. These are the moments for which consumers use Google most often.

“I want to know moments” are those situations where customers are doing research or product owners are trying to better understand something they’ve purchased. Because so many marketers don’t have the content that serves these customers’ “I want to know moments,” they’re turning to Google to find the answer.

Read more at Hammock.com’s Idea Blog

It’s not about the salt

Marketing gurus are calling this an advertising and content campaign.

Huh?

They’re calling it “branded music” too.

Huh?

Calling this content marketing because there’s a Morton’s salt ad at the end and it’s being released on YouTube is about as innovative as every video ever produced. (Remember, they are all created as a content marketing campaign to sell music.)

If a salt company wants to pay for product placement, they can do so, but don’t call it innovative marketing.

On the other hand, the video is spectacularly innovative.

And for the record, I just spent five minutes promoting this to the 12 people who read this blog.