For my Nashville Walking and Biking Friends

Bookmark this on your iPhone so you’ll be a tap away from complaining at all times.

I used to complain about stuff in my head. Then someone on the Nashville Walking & Biking Email Group sent this list out and I tried calling someone up and telling them about the issue. Amazingly, it worked. P.S. Here’s the link to that email group. I’m one of the people who manages it, so contact me if you feel the need to complain about the list. Call these people to complain about everything else.

Report a sidewalk or bike lane maintenance issue

If you encounter a sidewalk or bike lane in need of maintenance, please let Metro Public Works know by calling (615) 862-8750 or filing a report online at https://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Forms/Request-Customer-Service.aspx

Report a greenway or trail maintenance issue

Please share greenway maintenance requests with the parks department by calling Metro Parks at (615) 862-8400 or emailing MetroParks@nashville.gov

Report issues with temporarily closed sidewalks and bikeways

Please report any issues with sidewalk and bike lane closures due to construction or special events to the Metro Public Works Permit Office by calling (615) 862-8782 or emailing pwpermits@nashville.gov

Report signs or overgrown vegetation blocking public right of way

Please report any signs or vegetation blocking sidewalks or bike lanes to Metro Public Works know by calling (615) 862-8750 or filing a report online at https://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Forms/Request-Customer-Service.aspx

Report an aggressive driver

If you are harassed or endangered by an aggressive driver while walking or biking, please file a report with Metro Nashville Police Department’s Aggressive Driving Unit online at https://www.nashville.gov/Police-Department/Online-Services/Report-Aggressive-Driver.aspx

Report people who park illegally in bike lanes and sidewalks

You can report drivers who are illegally parked on sidewalks and in bike lanes to the Metro Police Department non emergency line at (615) 862-8600 or online at https://www.nashville.gov/Police-Department/Contact-Us.aspx

Request traffic enforcement

If you have concerns about speeding or other traffic violations, you can request an enforcement operation. For more information, visit http://www.nashville.gov/Services/Frequently-Asked-Question-Center/FAQ-Details/ID/198/How-Do-I-Request-Police-Radar-or-Traffic-Enforcement-Near-My-Home

Report Issues with Public Transit

If you have questions or concerns about transit connections, placement of bus stops, or issues around accessibility.
http://www.nashvillemta.org/Nashville-MTA-customer-comments.asp

Happy Bike to Work Day, Nashville | 2016

As the 12 regular readers of this blog know, I try to commute to work by bicycle 2-3 times a week. I do it for recreation, transportation and enjoyment. Obviously, there are many health-related benefits from riding a bike 15 miles round-trip, but I don’t use the “exercise” word when discussing bicycling. Exercising is something I avoid. Riding a bike is something I love.

I’m heading out now for Bike to Work Day. Below is a map where different groups will meet-up for the ride into work.

In 2013, I posted some maps to show my route into work to show my fellow-Nashvillians that there are ways to ride into downtown without getting into traffic. You can find that post here.

I love riding a bike for fun. You should try it. (I and many others are trying to make it safer and easier to ride bikes and walk in Nashville. That day will come.)

(If you don’t see a map below, click here.)

Yield to The Optical Illusion Planks Painted on The Street

Zebra crossings—the striped crosswalks common on roads around the world—don’t necessarily work very well.

All over Nashville’s “urban core,” there are pedestrian crosswalks with large white stripes painted on the street and a large “Yield” traffic sign displaying an arrow pointing down at the stripes. “STATE LAW,” these signs sream in all caps..

Crosswalk_fiYet something about that combination of white stripes, “STATE LAW” and the Yield sign makes people who drive cars think they have the right away if a person walking wants to cross the street.

So when I saw these photos and a story on FastCompany.com, I couldn’t help but laugh and think how great it would be to see these appear in Nashville.

3059344-inline-i-1-these-optical-illusions-slow-down-drivers-at-crosswalksQuote:

Zebra crossings—the striped crosswalks common on roads around the world—don’t necessarily work very well. In one Swedish study, drivers stopped for pedestrians only 5% of the time at the crosswalks and rarely slowed down. A city in India is experimenting with another approach: By adding some perspective shading to the stripes, the crosswalk looks a little like a roadblock from a distance.

Slowly, but Surely, Rollng Towards a Bike-Friendlier Nashville

My passions these days include doing what I can to make Nashville a city for people who walk and people who ride bicycles

Recently (4.11.2016), I took this photo of about 30 representatives of various Nashville bicycle tribes. Walk Bike Nashville organized a “round-up” of them held at Yazoo Brewery. Good job, Walk-Bike Nashville. Good beer, Yazoo. (Unsolicited shout-out: Try their Daddy-O Pilsner.) I was at the gathering representing Mayor Barry’s Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee.

The group represented many different bike-related organizations, ranging from non-profits, to various types of cycling enthusiasts (roads, off-road, commuters, slow-riders, night riders) to people who own pedal-propelled businesses — from shops to bike-tour businesses to food delivery services to the owner of Pedal Pub (although, I guess, technically-speaking, it’s not a “bicycle,” but it is powered by pedals ).

Each person who wanted to could spend five minutes talking about what their company, non-profit, advocacy group, public agency does. One after another, I heard some very inspiring stories about groups who have done various things, ranging from helping to build many of the off-road bike trails in Middle trails to learning more about one of my heroes, the quietly inspiring Dan Furbish of the Oasis Center Bike Workshop.

My passion for bicycling is focused on transportation, recreation and travel. It’s amazing to meet others who love bikes but who express their passion in so many different ways and that have so many different positive outcomes.

635967579643256482-IMG-2290One day, when Nashville completes what’s necessary to have the walking/biking infrastructure necessary to make people feel safe, I’ll be appreciative to the folks I’ve met in the past three years who have, in often quiet ways, done so much to create the foundation that’s necessary to build a great bicycling/walking town.

Which brings me to an announcement Nashville Mayor Megan Barry made earlier this week and that is covered in this Tennessean story.

As my passions these days include doing what I can to make Nashville a city for people who walk and people who ride bicycles — as well as people who drive cars — these kinds of projects regarding specific locations and time-frames for development are what is needed to convey to Nashvillians why I’m optimistic about the future. (Impatient, but optimistic.)

Nashville Will Have its First Open Streets Festival on June 27

The inaugural Nashville Open Streets Festival takes place on June 27, 2015 from 11-2pm.

Nashvillians, mark your calendars. In three weeks, a mile-long stretch of Division Street and 11th Avenue (basically, “The Gultch”) will turn into a three-hour family-friendly greenway.

Open_Streets_2015 The inaugural Nashville Open Streets Festival takes place on June 27, 2015 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (And it’s free.)

It will be a somewhat shorter version of such open streets events that have grown extremely popular in cities around the world. (They are also referred to as ciclovias or cyclovias, a spanish word meaning “cycleway,” as they originated in Bogata, Columbia, in the mid 1970s.)

What is an Open Streets Festival?

Read more “Nashville Will Have its First Open Streets Festival on June 27”