Category Archives: content

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Gonenett

Today, the company that owns the former hometown newspaper of Nashville and 80 other cities in the U.S. announced its plans to split into two companies. (1) Gannett Good Stuff Inc. and  (2) Gannett Bad Stuff Inc.

Gannett Good Stuff will be lots of TV stations and internet companies like Cars.com and CareerBuilder.com.

Gannett Bad Stuff will be 81 former local newspapers that will continue their transition into local delivery van companies specializing in distributing bundled advertising circulars to the front doors of local residents each Sunday morning. The rest of the week, the vans will be used in a new partnership Gannett Bad Stuff has entered into with the internet startup Uber.

The transaction is designed to generate large bonuses and fees for the company’s most senior executives, law firms and investment bankers.

The transaction also will lead to another round of downsizing at the 81 local delivery van companies because, well, that’s what synergy is all about.

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Hey, General Mills Lawyers: Better Eat Your Wheaties

(See update at the end of the post.)

While I typically support efforts to add sanity to our overly-litigious culture that seems to encourage anyone to sue anybody for anything, I don’t think the lawyers at General Mills thought through the type of social media firestorm they would ignite by adding language to the company’s website alerting customers they can’t take legal action against the company if they’ve done things like download a coupon, enter a contest or, if read literally, liked on Facebook one of the company’s products, say, Cheerios or Wheaties or Macaroni Grill or Fruit Loops.

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My goofy animated GIF went viral

sochi olympic rings gif parodyAt Hammock, we are experimenting with ways in which GIFs and things like Vine can be used as something more than goofy viral fodder. (We’re already convinced on their goofy viral fodder potential.) Personally, I think animated GIFS have great potential as illustrations in how-to posts, as I mentioned in a post recently.

Before getting too far into thinking I know how to use a medium or format based solely on what I’ve seen others do, it’s my belief that I should first “play” with it in a sandbox in ways that help me understand personally how I can bend and flex the format.

Sometimes that means trying to do things that involve understanding “hacks” (in the positive use of the word to mean “creative work arounds”) necessary to get something to work a little more elegantly than on a software program devoted specifically to the format.

Yesterday,  for example, I was doing a quick project that involved me creating a GIF in which I had to use three different software applications: ScreenFlow, Keynote and GIF Brewery. (In the past, I would have needed a third program, iMovie, to accomplish the effect I was seeking, however ScreenFlow has now become a robust video editing tool in addition to being an excellent screen capture tool.)

A few moments into my efforts, I saw a photo on Twitter of the problem that occurred with the snow-flake Olympic Rings effect at the opening ceremonies of the Sochi Olympics.

It just so happened that the GIF I was using in my “sandbox” involved an effect that inspired me to see the missing ring in the way it appears in my GIF above. (The following is for how-to geeks: I was testing if ScreenFlow will capture video in the form of a .mov file that has been embedded in a Keynote slide when you are in the “play” mode. It does.)

Even though the ceremonies would not appear on U.S. TV for several hours, I went a head and posted the GIF on my Tumblr account and forgot about it.

This morning, the GIF has 7.5 K likes and reblogs vs. my typical Tumblr metric: 0.*

Bottomline 1: It’s great to read what others do, but playing around with this stuff yourself is how you learn it.

Bottomline 2: It’s the goofy viral GIF that goes viral.

*Later: I wasn’t exaggerating when I said “zero.” The trend line below displays the typical “activity” on my Tumblr account. Activity refers to reblogs (shares) or likes a post receives on Tumblr. Tumblr is the social medium I use that is even less read than this blog, but I love the platform and am happy that Yahoo! hasn’t ruined it yet by adding that ridiculous Yahoo! bar across the top of it like it has to Flickr.

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Breaking good: A ten minute chat with Professor Jeff Cornwall

Jeff Cornwall, Belmont University entrepreneurship professor and longtime blogger (The Entrepreneurial Mind), recently invited me to appear on the video version of his blog — a show that is produced by the Nashville-based web video network, Talkapolis (think Leo Laport’s TWit network with a southern accent). The episode was posted today. It was to visit with Dr. Cornwall and I appreciated the chance to explain the customer media and content focus of Hammock Inc. — and our role in the context of today’s marketing landscape. Here’s is an embed of the 10 minute interview.

On Chris Brogan’s podcast, taking about customer media, content and if living in Nashville is part of why I do things the way I do

humanway-logoRecently, Chris Brogan invited me onto his very popular podcast where we talked a lot about how companies and businesses are using media and content to connect directly with their customers.

It’s sometimes challenging to explain what I do (especially to people with tweet-sized concentration), but Chris’ approach helped me come close. If you are one of the 12 readers of this blog, you may find it of interest.

Or not.

Either way, I had fun talking with him.