Of Course I Want a Self-Driving Car

Bring on the self-driving cars. I’ll be at the front of the line.


(Via AdAge.comA Gallup poll recently released…shows that plenty of Americans are still freaked out by the concept (or a self-driving car). Fifty-four percent of the U.S. respondents say they’re unlikely to use self-driving cars, according to “Americans Hit the Brakes on Self-Driving Cars,” which was released last week. The findings came from a larger Northeastern University/Gallup survey of Americans’ attitudes on artificial intelligence. People ages 66 and older have the greatest resistance, not surprisingly, with 69 percent saying they’re unlikely to use self-driving cars. Acceptance grows the younger the generation. People ages 18 to 35 are fairly split at 36 percent likely and 41 percent unlikely.


Are they kidding? When the reality of self-driving cars replaces the vehicles imagined by these surveyed older people, they will view self-driving cars as a means to retain their independence and freedom.

I recall that when my father was in his late 70s and still driving, he was in a wreck and had his driver’s license taken away. As driving back and forth to a gym was the central focus of his routine, he was determined to regain his license, or, more accurately, his independence.

This was not a goal anyone else endorsed. He had never been a good driver. For example, he never figured out that cars had side-view mirrors that could be used when changing lanes on an interstate highway. He just changed lanes when he felt it was time to change lanes.

But somehow, he was able to pass a drivers test and regained his license for a while, at least.

Autonomous autos have the potential of providing more mobility to older people or people with vision problems, even blindness, or people like me who hate to drive so much I ride a bike whenever possible.

Here’s a 360-degree video that Alphabet’s Waymo posted on YouTube today that is trying to persuade the masses that self-driving cars will be a lot less scary after we get to ride around in them. I can’t wait.

No You Can’t Contribute a Guest Post to this Blog

Ugh.

Several times a day, I receive requests from people who want to write a “guest post” on my blog. They are from individuals who seem desperate to have link-backs from this blog (and also from SmallBusiness.com, which is neither a blog nor does it carry “posts.” However, we do post articles on the site.)

Often, they are written like this one I received earlier today:

Since long time I have been following your blog and had read most of your article which is very useful and informative.

When I receive “guest blog” requests like this one spit out by Google translate, I immediately click the spam button.

If I did not receive so many of these email schemes, I’d take time to point to one of Google’s several warnings on why someone shouldn’t be so desperate to succeed in practices that end up hurting them.

When Searching for a Satirical Legal Document, Don’t Use the Words Satirical and Legal

Turns out, funny legal documents are a thing.

Until I read this funny parody of a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) on NewYorker.com, I had never considered the possibility that satirical legal document humor could be a thing. Perhaps that’s because while jokes about lawyers are funny, legal documents aren’t — except to lawyers or people forced to sign documents written by them.

Quote from parody NDA:

FINALLY, Contractor agrees never to disclose to anybody, including and ESPECIALLY himself/herself, that he/she has only taken this job because signing an N.D.A. made it seem more important than it probably is, and deep down he/she is a little disappointed about where he/she is at this point in his/her life.

Wondering if there were other examples of this kind of legal document humor, I did a Google search and found that Google was incapable of finding anything that has “legal” and “satire” in the same sentence that was legal satire. Despite spending billions on artificial intelligence, Google couldn’t guess that I was using legal and parody in the same sentence to see if I could find parodies about legal documents.

So I stopped looking.

Then, a few days later, just like when you wake up in the morning after not being able to solve a crossword puzzle word the night before and suddenly you know the word, I thought to myself, just use the word “funny” instead of parody. It worked.

Turns out, funny legal documents are a thing.