The Best Thing About Blogging

There are many great things about having a personal blog and consistently posting to it. And none of the great things are about trying to be a “thought leader” or personal brand. After blogging (more-or-less consistently) for 17 years, I’ve discovered that much of what I write is like jotting down a note to the future me.

RexBlog on Jan. 9, 2007

Like today. Ten years ago today, I was in San Francisco. I was on about the 20th row when Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone. Because I blog, I can go back and read what I said that day and said a few days afterward.

In the past decade, I’ve blogged tens of thousands of words about Apple products.

But there’s something great about reading what you first thought about something that later turned out to be more (or less) significant.

It makes you feel like you were clueless…or insightful. But that you had any opinion at all makes you feel connected to an event in some way.

The headline of the post where I wrote my response is, “The least impressive thing about the iPhone is that it’s a phone.”

Ten years later, I think I nailed it.

What else happened on this day, ten years ago.

Looking at other posts of the day, I see that MyBlogLog.com was going to be purchased by Yahoo. Later, that would be as disastrous as most Yahoo acquisitions were.

AppleTV was released.

While I didn’t blog about it, ten years ago today was the first time I ever used Twitter. I had set up an account a few months earlier (in the year 2006), but MacWorld was the first time I used it. Why? The media center (I had press credentials thanks to a friend in high places), encouraged reporters to follow their posts to Twitter (“tweets” didn’t exist yet) to learn about changes in the MacWorld schedule or other updates. This was back when it was far easier to understand what Twitter was (a group text messaging thingee) than it is today. (However, for months, I continued to think it was a method for PR people to distribute text messages.)

The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

David McCul a great book, but for reasons I wasn’t expecting.

I’m reading (and listening to) David McCullough’s wonderful new book, The Wright Brothers.

This isn’t a review, as I’ve only read about one-third of the book. But I’ve read enough to know that anyone who has ever has faced adversity and challenge and ridicule will recognize something familiar in the story. These brothers were from Dayton, Ohio, and funded the venture themselves. And besides, everyone know that no one would ever fly. Why? Because all of the big thinkers of the day said so.

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How Millennials (Not Al Gore) Invented the Internet

Millennials don’t just use social media, they invented it. (Like Al Gore invented the internet.)

Editor’s Note

For this post, the term Millennial refers to people born between 1982 and 2004. (Math help: People who are currently (i.e., 2014) between the ages of 10 and 32.) Also, while this post refers to a golden age, NOTHING in it refers to fringe New Testament apocalyptic theology.

Introduction

During the first part of the 20th century, the french philosopher and sociologist Maurice Halbwachs advanced the idea of “collective memory” — a shared pool of information held in the memories of two or more members of a group. Or at least that’s what a group of two or more members of a group of people wrote in the Maurice Halbwachs Wikipedia entry.

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The History of Content Marketing: Nashville Bicycle Messenger, 1910

Nashville, November 1910. “George Christopher, Postal Telegraph messenger #7, fourteen years old. Been at it over three years. Does not work nights.”

Nashville, November 1910. “George Christopher, Postal Telegraph messenger #7, fourteen years old. Been at it over three years. Does not work nights.”

The photograph and caption are both by Lewis Wickes Hine, who took thousands of portraits of young bicycle messengers and other child laborers on behalf of the Nation Child Labor Committee at the turn of the 20th century. Hine’s photos, and the work of the committee, are credited with influencing public opinion to the degree that in 1916, Congress passed legislation protecting children: the Keating-Owen Act.

The Library of Congress photographic collections house more than five thousand original Lewis Hine photographs, given to the library by the National Child Labor Committee.

(via: Veloaficionado)

The NYT’s Chronicle: A Timeline of the Usage of Words & Phrases


(Above: According to Chronicle, the word “Rex” peaked a century ago. Oh well.)


The New York Times has opened to the public a graphing tool called Chronicle, an N-gram viewer that generates a timeline chart of the usage of a word or phrase appearing in the New York Times during the past 162 years.

The tool is very similar to Google’s Ngram Viewer a graphing tool that generates a timeline of words or phrases appearing in books scanned into the database of Google Books.

Alexis Lloyd, Chronicle’s creator, explains it in this blog post.

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