It’s a Big World, Afterall: Earth View from Google (Chrome, Firefox Extention)

Earthview from Google browser extension has an option that displays a new location everytime you open a new tab.

Via Lifehacker | Visit New Places Every Day in Your Browser with This Google Earth Extension.

“Not every Chrome or Firefox extension you use has to be one-hundred-percent dedicated to productivity or utility. Sometimes, it’s just nice to look at something pretty. And in the case of Earth View from Google Earth (Chrome, Firefox), I don’t really care if it eats up my browser’s memory or otherwise impacts its performance in any way. It makes me happy, and it’ll make you happy too—exactly why this is our Extension of the Week.”

Tweetdecking is Either a New Buzzword or a Doomed One

Tweetdecking, we hardly knew you.

I’ve often said that if you try to game Google for SEO purposes, you are going up against the best engineers in the world. And since the Goose that lays the Golden Google eggs is the quality of search results, anything that is done outside the parameters of what Google approves of is like asking Google to turn you into invisibility.

Twitter seems to be understanding that approach…finally. Seems like they started crushing something called “tweetdecking” over the weekend.

via BuzzFeed:

Tweetdecking, as it’s called, is an explicit violation of Twitter’s spam policy, which does not allow users to “sell, purchase, or attempt to artificially inflate account interactions.”

Still, Twitter has previously struggled to crack down on these accounts.

After a BuzzFeed News story uncovered the practice of tweetdecking in January, Twitter announced new spam-fighting changes to Tweetdeck, including removing the ability to simultaneously retweet a tweet across multiple accounts.

Tweetdecking is over. Our follower gains are gonna diminish,” Andrew Guerrero, a 23-year-old tweetdecker in New Mexico, told BuzzFeed News after Twitter announced the changes in February.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

 

Snap!

When something doesn’t make sense, there’s a reason. Unless there isn’t.

Yesterday, Kylie Jenner tweeted that she hasn’t used Snapchap lately and, poof, the market-cap of Snap drops by $1.3 billion. (Today it’s market cap is around $20 billion.)

While that may not be as dramatic a swing as you’d witness during a typical hour of, say, Bitcoin, it makes me recall when MySapce was worth $12 billion.

Just saying.

@NinaTotenberg Re-Tweets

Two following tweets are from NPR’s Supreme Court correspondent @NinaTotenberg about the death of Justice Scalia. Compare specifically how many people re-tweet and like the “tweet about the actual news” vs. “the tweet about what she was doing when she heard the news.”

The fact that NPR listeners have re-tweeted the “news process” story far more than the “news” story mean only one thing about NPR listeners:

1. NPR Listeners are fascinated with the process of journalism exhibited by one of the foremost experts on the Supreme Court.

What I Favor vs. What Twitter Likes

I used to write a lot about Twitter. For example, here is a collection of 10,000+ words I wrote in a series of blog posts called “Thoughts on Twitter.” In brief, all those words say that Twitter was (they were written years ago) great because no two people use it the same way. And anyone who tried to explain how one was supposed to use Twitter broke the first rule of Twitter: You can’t make up rules for how others use Twitter. Back then, Twitter was a feature of a failed product (Odeo) that lived on past the product failure to become an  easy  means to send out a group text message. Back then, the cool things about Twitter were being created by its users. [Most obvious example: @ChrisMesinna  (not the actor) who is responsible for the #hashtag.]

Rather than repeat any more of those 10,000 words, I’ll stop there and say, Twitter is best when you realize it now belongs to someone else, someone who tomorrow could decide that the #hashtag should be a ~tilde or the star should become a heart.

Twitter is now like professional football.  Imagine if all football was eight years ago was (hash)tag football played in a parking lot and today it had to be the NFL, a $billion business that has to make money from huge advertisers and fans who just want to see the game and buy a hot dog.

People say, “professional sports are no longer about the game, they are just part of the entertainment business.” But people who are really fans of a specific sport or team can find a way to peer through the hype and corporate greed and recognize that somewhere buried in all that crap, the game still exists.

Bottomline: Like it, or favorite it, Twitter belongs to the people who own it, not the people who use it. The people who run it will keep trying to “fix” it so the owners will like it. The people who use it will put up with all those useless “fixes” if they can recognize that it’s still tag football under all that crap. If they don’t see the game, they’ll use it to promote what they are doing somewhere else that’s more fun.