Boring Events Like the NFL Draft Work Because of Twitter

Watching the NFL draft on TV is ridiculously boring, despite everything the NFL and ESPN do to focus on back-stories (dipping into ABC’s creation of the “up close and personal” documentary approach to turn sports like curling into emotional personal stories of victory over adversity), punditry and more big data than the NSA collects on the leaders of foreign governments.

However, Twitter can turn boring events into an entertaining event fueled by back-channel quips, snark, insight and, my favorite, “irrational hate.”

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Some Pinterest Users are Learning the Price of Free

Almost three years ago, to the day, I blogged about Pinterest users (and users of other social media platforms) understanding the reality that if you use a platform controlled by someone else, you are a hamster in their cage (a metaphor I first learned from Dave Winer).

The post I wrote three years ago, “Just Because You Can Make Money From Something, Doesn’t Mean You Should, and Other Rules of the Web,” was about Pinterest being accused of “skimming links” — the practice of finding links on their platform  that go to ecommerce sites and converting those links to affiliate links in order to generate commissions from those ecommerce companies.

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How Millennials (Not Al Gore) Invented the Internet

Editor’s Note

For this post, the term Millennial refers to people born between 1982 and 2004. (Math help: People who are currently (i.e., 2014) between the ages of 10 and 32.) Also, while this post refers to a golden age, NOTHING in it refers to fringe New Testament apocalyptic theology.

Introduction

During the first part of the 20th century, the french philosopher and sociologist Maurice Halbwachs advanced the idea of “collective memory” — a shared pool of information held in the memories of two or more members of a group. Or at least that’s what a group of two or more members of a group of people wrote in the Maurice Halbwachs Wikipedia entry.

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The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is Fun(d)raising at its Finest

Forgive me, but you’ll find at the bottom of this post yet another Ice Bucket Challenge video. I was on vacation and somewhat off the grid a couple of weeks ago when the ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) Ice Bucket Challenge meme hit, so I wasn’t quite sure what the shout-out from Hammock president John Lavey was all about when it hit my in-box.

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Hey, General Mills Lawyers: Better Eat Your Wheaties

(See update at the end of the post.)

While I typically support efforts to add sanity to our overly-litigious culture that seems to encourage anyone to sue anybody for anything, I don’t think the lawyers at General Mills thought through the type of social media firestorm they would ignite by adding language to the company’s website alerting customers they can’t take legal action against the company if they’ve done things like download a coupon, enter a contest or, if read literally, liked on Facebook one of the company’s products, say, Cheerios or Wheaties or Macaroni Grill or Fruit Loops.

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