The Optimization of ‘Huh?’

A picture I took recently in a Vermont general store. The boxes orchestrated my optimal interactions.

A national organization comprised of marketing executives just sent me and thousands more (I guess) an email inviting me to watch an online presentation they are hosting.

The title of the presentation starts:

“Orchestrating Optimal Interactions…”

There were lots more words in the presentation title, but I couldn’t make it past those first three.

Shouldn’t marketing executives speak English (or whatever their native tongue might be)?

I suggest they rename the presentation, “How to sell stuff.”

‘I Want to Know’ Moments & ‘I Want to Buy’ Moments

On Hammock’s Idea Blog, we’re discussing the two types of customer moments that marketers should prepare for by developing “content assets.” It’s similar to a concept in Hammock’s eBook Content Along the Customer Journey. Rather than thinking that marketing with content is a series of posts, tweets, likes, consider all the way content assests can be developed to reach customers at those times they want the information you can provide.

Google calls them:

1. I want to buy moments.
2. I want to know moments.

“I want to buy moments” are those situations where consumers have seen a TV ad or are trying to find the closest restaurant or drugstore. These are the moments for which consumers use Google most often.

“I want to know moments” are those situations where customers are doing research or product owners are trying to better understand something they’ve purchased. Because so many marketers don’t have the content that serves these customers’ “I want to know moments,” they’re turning to Google to find the answer.

Read more at Hammock.com’s Idea Blog

It’s not about the salt

Marketing gurus are calling this an advertising and content campaign.

Huh?

They’re calling it “branded music” too.

Huh?

Calling this content marketing because there’s a Morton’s salt ad at the end and it’s being released on YouTube is about as innovative as every video ever produced. (Remember, they are all created as a content marketing campaign to sell music.)

If a salt company wants to pay for product placement, they can do so, but don’t call it innovative marketing.

On the other hand, the video is spectacularly innovative.

And for the record, I just spent five minutes promoting this to the 12 people who read this blog.

Actual Good Deals on Amazon Prime Day

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Some people celebrate Amazon’s Prime Day by trying to be funny in tweets with the hashtag #PrimeDay or #PrimeDayFail. Once in a while they are funny. But mostly, they are ham-fisted, profane and goofy.

Once in awhile, the Amazon deal is actually a good deal.

Here are the best places to look for good stuff. Well, best if you have my narrow tastes. (Note, the links are affiliate links. I think I’ve made $5 in commissions since 2004):

Amazon devices
Power tools, yes!
Bicycle stuff
Hammock stuff

And then there is this worst-ever Prime Day Deal and an affront to the Rex brand.

awful-rex-sweater


This SmallBusiness.com post has some suggestions about where to look for deals from local sellers on Amazon.


Why Conventional Wisdom Is the Enemy of Marketing Innovation

By the time innovative, creative and insightful marketing trends become conventional marketing wisdom, they are no longer innovative, creative or insightful.

(via: Hammock.com Idea Email) By the time innovative, creative and insightful marketing trends become conventional marketing wisdom, they are no longer innovative, creative or insightful.

Conventional wisdom is where innovation goes to become institutionalized, codified and organized around an ecosystem of conferences, acronyms and buzzwords. Conventional wisdom is where innovation goes to receive venture funding, branding and a corps of true believers who are willing to master its language, metrics and software platforms.

(Continue reading on Hammock.com…)