Picasso’s Women of Algiers Sets Auction Record for a Piece of Visual Content

Earlier tonight, Picasso’s Women of Algiers set the record of $179.2 million for a painting sold at auction.

For my fellow professional creators of content, I should explain that “a painting” was a term people used in the last century and before to describe what today we call “content” or, sometimes, “visual content.” (Back then, people also had different terms for various types of visual content; words like painting, photography, film, etc.)

And before the 21st century, people would use terms like “experience” or “view” to describe how they engaged with visual content — what we now call the “consuming of content.”

Top 15 Reasons Picasso Was an Awesome Visual Contentist

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Modern Family’s ‘Connection Lost’ Episode as Allegory

No doubt, there are hundreds of posts this morning in which bloggers are trying to explain the top 10 this or that’s about the episode of Modern Family that aired last night (“Connection Lost,” Season 6, Episode 16).

For that reason, I haven’t read any blog posts regarding the show. If this sounds like I’m borrowing the observation of others, I’m actually not (this time, at least).

I did read one review and it was insightful (unlike this post, perhaps). It’s written by Gwen Ihnat at AV Club. She calls the episode, “A gimmicky but successful storytelling experiment.”

What you’re about to read is my observation of the show as an allegory (or parable, if you prefer).

SPOILER ALERT: I include some spoilers in this post, but I could tell you everything that happens and it wouldn’t matter.

Here are several things I won’t be writing about in this post

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Writing by Talking Instead of Typing

(What you’re about to read was dictated by me into a machine.)

Through the years, I’ve purchased numerous iterations of dictation software from the company now called Nuance. For some reason, dictating has never worked for me. Perhaps it’s because I was born after the Don Draper era. When I graduated from college, I could type 80 words a minute, which is probably faster than I can think. I can probably type faster than that now, but as anyone who has read this blog knows, the faster I type the more goofy things I say. And one of my rules of blogging is to not work over the text as much as I would if this were, say,  a final edit of something  that was going to be read by more than 12 people.  (I love you, but you’re the only one reading this.)

In other words, a lot of what you see on this blog is  more like a first draft  than any kind of finished writing.  Bottomline: I’ve always been able to type fast, so I never really learned how to dictate.

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The Pundit’s Worst Fear: When Facts Don’t Support the Narrative

All week, anyone who follows the news has been carpet-bombed with punditry informing them that House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s defeat was because he supported immigration reform. Yet now, polls on both the right and left are revealing that immigration reform was far down on the list of issues that influenced the election’s outcome. Reporting on a poll conducted by Americans for a Conservative Direction, Politico says, “Only 22 percent of Virginia residents who voted for Cantor’s opponent, Dave Brat, cited immigration as the primary reason for their vote. About 77 percent cited other factors, such as the Republican leader’s focus on national politics instead of local issues.” (Tip O’Niell was, is, and will always be correct.)

I doubt, however, that such polls will change the narrative related to why Cantor lost. That the hubris and national aspirations of Cantor were the likely causes of his defeat, don’t fit nicely into a bigger narrative that works for pundits and analysts. Those are too nuanced and local…and personal, and don’t fit nicely into a national debate over one issue.

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