Competitive Outrage

I haven’t commented on the outrage of the week, the killing of Zimbabwe’s “most beloved lion,” Cecil, by a big game hunting dentist from Minnesota named Walter Palmer.

By the time I was aware of the Cecil killing, the internet outrage was far more than anything I could come up with, so I passed even tweeting about it. Besides, the only thing I could think of to say that I hadn’t seen before was how white the dentist’s teeth were — obviously, a Photoshop job.

The competitive nature of internet outrage is fascinating.

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Funny of Die Thinks Old People (in Their 70s) Are a Riot

Funny or Die and the music festival Bonnaroo “teamed up” to take four “old people” in their 70s to Bonnaroo so the other 80,000 attendees could see how cute four old people can be when interacting with festival goers and hearing new-fangled music.


 

In addition to being blatantly ageist bigotry, the premise seems to fall apart when you consider that Funny or Die’s criteria for being an “old person” is being born before 1946. By that definition, here are some other cute old people they could have wheel-chaired around the festival include:

Eric Clapton
Bette Midler
Neil Young
Bob Seger
Carly Simon
Pete Townson
John Fogerty
Diana Ross
Roger Dalton
Jeff Beck
Mick Jagger
Keith Richards
Paul McCartney (last year’s headliner)
Ringo Starr
Joni Mitchell
Aretha Franklin
Carole King
Bob Dylan
Paul Simon
Art Garfunkel

This list could go on and on.

(Note: On the other hand, their criteria makes someone like me, born well into the 1950s, feel young.)

The Confederate Flag is NOT a Part of Who I Am

By birth, choice and the grace of God, I am a Southerner.

I grew up in Alabama and have spent most of my life in Tennessee. In other words, I’ve lived all my life way down yonder in the land of cotton. My love of the South is about home, family and place. It’s about language and literature. It’s about football. It’s about the creativity and cadence found in the way people paint pictures when they recount even the simplest of stories. It’s about food and the aroma of the places where food is prepared. It’s about music. It’s about so many of the people I love. It’s about those things, and so much more.

But my love of the South has nothing to do with the Confederate flag and the racism it so thoroughly symbolizes.

In the wake of the Charleston Church killings on Wednesday night, the state of South Carolina should stop flying the Confederate flag on the grounds of the state capitol.

But let that be just the start. Get rid of the symbol from any state flag or any crest or any shield from any state. And now that the Supreme Court has ruled that states can deny Confederate flags from being on vanity license plates, those states that have them, starting with Tennessee, should get rid of them as soon as possible.

I am NOT suggesting the purging of history. I am advocating the purging of the glorification of a mythological history that never existed.

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Picasso’s Women of Algiers Sets Auction Record for a Piece of Visual Content

Earlier tonight, Picasso’s Women of Algiers set the record of $179.2 million for a painting sold at auction.

For my fellow professional creators of content, I should explain that “a painting” was a term people used in the last century and before to describe what today we call “content” or, sometimes, “visual content.” (Back then, people also had different terms for various types of visual content; words like painting, photography, film, etc.)

And before the 21st century, people would use terms like “experience” or “view” to describe how they engaged with visual content — what we now call the “consuming of content.”

Top 15 Reasons Picasso Was an Awesome Visual Contentist

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Modern Family’s ‘Connection Lost’ Episode as Allegory

No doubt, there are hundreds of posts this morning in which bloggers are trying to explain the top 10 this or that’s about the episode of Modern Family that aired last night (“Connection Lost,” Season 6, Episode 16).

For that reason, I haven’t read any blog posts regarding the show. If this sounds like I’m borrowing the observation of others, I’m actually not (this time, at least).

I did read one review and it was insightful (unlike this post, perhaps). It’s written by Gwen Ihnat at AV Club. She calls the episode, “A gimmicky but successful storytelling experiment.”

What you’re about to read is my observation of the show as an allegory (or parable, if you prefer).

SPOILER ALERT: I include some spoilers in this post, but I could tell you everything that happens and it wouldn’t matter.

Here are several things I won’t be writing about in this post

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