Convenience is Boring

Not exactly sure if I agree, but it’s too convenient to pass up.

Not exactly sure if I agree, but it’s too convenient to pass up.

From: “The Tyranny of Convenience” by Tim Wu. New York Times, 2/16/2018

Quote:

“Convenience is the most underestimated and least understood force in the world today…Convenience is boring. But boring is not the same thing as trivial…The paradoxical truth I’m driving at is that today’s technologies of individualization are technologies of mass individualization. Customization can be surprisingly homogenizing. (Nearly everyone is on Facebook.) It is the most convenient way to keep track of your friends and family, who in theory should represent what is unique about you and your life. Yet Facebook seems to make us all the same. Its format and conventions strip us of all but the most superficial expressions of individuality, such as which particular photo of a beach or mountain range we select as our background image.”


Photo | Julie Clopper | iStock

People Love Selfies, Unless They Are of Someone Else

Is this surprising? This is why they are called selfies.

According to TheNextWeb, researchers in Munich have found evidence to suggest that few people want to look at the selfies of others, but they love sharing their own. The findings of a survey of 238 people were published in Frontiers in Psychology in a January article titled “The Selfie Paradox: Nobody Seems to Like Them Yet Everyone Has Reasons to Take Them.”

77% | Take selfies at least once a month
49% | Receive a selfie at least once a week
90% | Think others’ selfies are self-promotion
46% | Think their own selfies are self-promotion

Translation | People enjoy taking selfies but don’t like looking at other peoples’ selfies. (The researchers say that other cultures than Germany may have more accepting attitudes towards selfies and that further study is required.)

Observation | Is this surprising? They are called selfies. It’s why Apple put a camera on both sides of the iPhone.

For some reason, selfies are of great interest to researchers and the publications that write about research. Bottomline. There are two types of people in the world: People who like taking photos of themselves and people who love to hear themselves complaining about people who take photos of themselves.


The image of the macaca is in the public domain because as the work of a non-human animal, it has no human author in whom copyright is vested.