RexBlog.com http://www.rexblog.com Rex Hammock's RexBlog.com Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:34:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.3 Convenience is Boring http://www.rexblog.com/2018/02/16/52334 http://www.rexblog.com/2018/02/16/52334#respond Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:34:19 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52334

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Not exactly sure if I agree, but it’s too convenient to pass up.

From: “The Tyranny of Convenience” by Tim Wu. New York Times, 2/16/2018

Quote:

“Convenience is the most underestimated and least understood force in the world today…Convenience is boring. But boring is not the same thing as trivial…The paradoxical truth I’m driving at is that today’s technologies of individualization are technologies of mass individualization. Customization can be surprisingly homogenizing. (Nearly everyone is on Facebook.) It is the most convenient way to keep track of your friends and family, who in theory should represent what is unique about you and your life. Yet Facebook seems to make us all the same. Its format and conventions strip us of all but the most superficial expressions of individuality, such as which particular photo of a beach or mountain range we select as our background image.”


Photo | Julie Clopper | iStock

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Marcus Mariota to Marcus Mariota http://www.rexblog.com/2018/01/08/52306 http://www.rexblog.com/2018/01/08/52306#respond Mon, 08 Jan 2018 21:37:43 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52306

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Dear future Rex,

I’m embedding the video below so that you can find it one day when watching Titan highlights becomes your primary pasttime.

I won’t forgive if you can’t recall it was 2018 (the 2017 season) when Marcus Mariota did something quarterbacks are trained not to do (be lead blockers for a Heisman Trophy-winning running back) and another something quaterbacks could train for their entire lives, and not have happen: throw themselves a touch-down pass.

Also, it was that year when the Titans squeaked into the play-offs and won this first-round game against the Chiefs.

As these two plays are much better seen than explained, here goes:

Your pal from 2018,

Rex

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http://www.rexblog.com/2018/01/08/52303 http://www.rexblog.com/2018/01/08/52303#respond Mon, 08 Jan 2018 21:00:22 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52303

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I didn’t watch the Golden Globe Awards last night. Come to think of it, I’ve never watched the Golden Globe Awards.

However, I was glad to learn that my favorite TV comedy or musical of the year, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, won the Golden Globe for best TV comedy or musical.

Even better, Rachel Brosnahan, the incredible actress who plays Midge Maisel, won the Golden Globe award for best actress in a leading role.

Here’s the trailer for the pilot of the series. While great, the series really gets its wheels about mid-way through the second season.

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It’s Like Gambling With Monopoly Money http://www.rexblog.com/2017/12/06/52300 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/12/06/52300#respond Wed, 06 Dec 2017 23:37:35 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52300

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Jim Cramer’s style doesn’t work for me, but what he says about Bitcoin in this clip is worth a listen.

Cramer: Bitcoin is like ‘monopoly money’ — this is pure gambling from CNBC.

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No You Can’t Contribute a Guest Post to this Blog http://www.rexblog.com/2017/11/10/52289 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/11/10/52289#respond Fri, 10 Nov 2017 17:25:13 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52289

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Several times a day, I receive requests from people who want to write a “guest post” on my blog. They are from individuals who seem desperate to have link-backs from this blog (and also from SmallBusiness.com, which is neither a blog nor does it carry “posts.” However, we do post articles on the site.)

Often, they are written like this one I received earlier today:

Since long time I have been following your blog and had read most of your article which is very useful and informative.

When I receive “guest blog” requests like this one spit out by Google translate, I immediately click the spam button.

If I did not receive so many of these email schemes, I’d take time to point to one of Google’s several warnings on why someone shouldn’t be so desperate to succeed in practices that end up hurting them.

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Rolling ’round Nashville http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/30/52279 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/30/52279#respond Mon, 30 Oct 2017 14:31:59 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52279

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Over the weekend, I took some photos of a couple of Nashville bike- and walk-friendly projects that have been planned for years but are now “for-real.” If you’re not interested in Nashville bicycle infrastructure, don’t feel lonely. One of this blog’s 12 readers is bound to find Nashville’s bike and walking infrastructure a riveting topic.

I-440 Greenway (Construction-Phase 1)

This set of photos (embedded from my Flickr account where each photo is annotated) are of the first phase of a stretch of greenway that runs adjacent to Nashville’s “inner-loop,” I-440. Even life-long Nashvillians would be challenged to know where the photos of the underpass are located, so I’ve embedded a Google Map below the photos. This section goes from Murphy Road to Centennial Park. The “magic” part of this greenway that few people with find hard to believe is the under-pass that goes under 440 rather than over it (like the current Acklen Park Ave. Bridge). When the greenway is completed, it will become a popular, safe and family-friendly bike/walk route to Centennial Park and the Vanderbilt area from neighborhoods west and north of this greenway (especially after the graffiti is removed).

I-440 Greenway Construction | 2017

Where the heck is this?

One the map, the bike icon is the location of the underpass.

Division Street Extender

I added a photo of Froogal McDoogals (a liquor store that anchors one end of the bridge) so that Nashvillians could quickly vector in on the location. For urban transportation wonks, the design of the bridge is called a Complete Street or “multimodal.” This simply means that the street was conceived as a passage not only for people driving cars but also with designated and protected lanes for people on bicycles and people walking. And when I say, “protected,” I don’t mean the white plastic separators going up around town (which I’m all for), but I’m referring to the metal kind you can see in the photos. The bridge and the approaches on each end are designed to connect “the Gultch” to Second Avenue, nearby the Music City Center.

Nashville | Division Street Bridge

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The Internet Archive Liberates a Mountain of Materials Published Between 1923-1941 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/11/52267 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/11/52267#respond Wed, 11 Oct 2017 12:10:43 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52267

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The Internet Archive (in my book, one of the few “wonders of the internet”) is now using a little known, and perhaps never used, provision of US copyright law (Section 108h) which allows libraries to scan and make available materials published 1923 to 1941 if they are not being actively sold. (Note: While I am not an anti-copyright advocate, I believe that certain types of copyrights should sunset in 14 years, renewable once if the copyright holder took actions to renew it. That’s 28 years. Okay, round it up to 30. But forever? At the bottom of this post, there’s a link to two articles I wrote on SmallBusiness.com about Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson and their beliefs on the topic.)

Quote from the Internet Archive blog:

Elizabeth Townsend Gard, a copyright scholar at Tulane University calls this “Library Public Domain.”  She and her students helped bring the first scanned books of this era available online in a collection named for the author of the bill making this necessary: The Sonny Bono Memorial Collection. Thousands more books will be added in the near future as we automate. We hope this will encourage libraries that have been reticent to scan beyond 1923 to start mass scanning their books and other works, at least up to 1942. (…)

 

If the Founding Fathers had their way, almost all works from the 20th century would be public domain by now (14-year copyright term, renewable once if you took extra actions).

 

Some corporations saw adding works to the public domain to be a problem, and when Sonny Bono got elected to the House of Representatives, representing part of Los Angeles, he helped push through a law extending copyright’s duration another 20 years to keep things locked-up back to 1923. This has been called the Mickey Mouse Protection Act due to one of the motivators behind the law, but it was also a result of Europe extending copyright terms an additional twenty years first. If not for this law, works from 1923 and beyond would have been in the public domain decades ago.

 

Today we announce the “Sonny Bono Memorial Collection” containing the first books to be liberated. Anyone can download, read, and enjoy these works that have been long out of print. We will add another 10,000 books and other works in the near future.

 

Professor Townsend Gard had two legal interns work with the Internet Archive last summer to find how we can automate finding appropriate scanned books that could be liberated, and hand-vetted the first books for the collection. Professor Townsend Gard has just released an in-depth paper giving libraries guidance as to how to implement Section 108(h) based on her work with the Archive and other libraries. Together, we have called them “Last Twenty” Collections, as libraries and archives can copy and distribute to the general public qualified works in the last twenty years of their copyright.

Sidenote by Rex: Here are a couple of articles I wrote a few years ago for SmallBusiness.com about the founding fathers, patents, and copyrights.

Benjamin Franklin Never Sought a Patent or Copyright

Thomas Jefferson’s Views on Patents and Intellectual Property Rights

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Spread Love http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/08/52255 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/10/08/52255#respond Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:48:25 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52255

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Video from last night’s “cold opening” of Saturday Night Live included a hopeful message on the tee-shirt of Jason Aldean’s dobro player. (The opening was Jason Aldean singing Tom Petty’s “Won’t Back Down.”) Did some googling and found the source of the message:

“Spread Love. It’s the Nashville Way.”

I wish it were always true; that “the Nashville way” is all about spreading love. I’ve seen lot’s of examples of Nashvillians spreading love. But I’ve examples of the opposite, also.

I wish spreading love was everyone’s way.

But we all fall short.

But I still think I’ll get one of the shirts to remind me to keep trying.

 

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Quick Observations About the iPhone X Presentation http://www.rexblog.com/2017/09/13/52248 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/09/13/52248#respond Wed, 13 Sep 2017 20:04:40 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52248

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Apple lovers (I confess) love product announcements. Tech writers love dissecting the features of new Apple products but never quite criticize them for fear that they will fall out of Apple’s graces. (Consumers only care what you can do with a product, not what chip it has.) Yesterday (September 12, 2017), another product announcement was made by Apple. Here are my thoughts about the announcement that only the ten people reading this care to know.


  1. If I were the number “9” I’d feel cheated.
  2. I liked the way Tim Cook, an Auburn alumni, used a photo featuring an Auburn football player when introducing the new Apple TV. (Auburn football and Apple TVs are both hobbies of Cook.)
  3. I also liked the way Tim Cook, a native of Alabama, still talks with an Alabama accent unlike other Alabama natives who don’t. Like me, for instance.
  4. The presentation was the first consumer-facing event (vs. a developer event) that flooded the zone with tech-features. That was all back-story narrative related to Samsung. Typically, only tech reporters love comparing one bezel to another bezel. Consumers live in a completely different world where no one knows what the hell a bezel is.
  5. Don’t buy a $1,000 iPhone unless you know why you are spending that much. If you are buying it to impress people, that makes sense: it’s a lot cheaper than buying a $50,000 car.
  6. Wearing blue jeans with your shirttail out does not hide your Dad bod.
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When disaster strikes “someplace else,” first send money | 2017 | Hurricane Harvey http://www.rexblog.com/2017/08/26/52236 http://www.rexblog.com/2017/08/26/52236#respond Sat, 26 Aug 2017 16:40:23 +0000 http://www.rexblog.com/?p=52236

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Give relief to those affected by #HurricaneHarvey
• Call 1-800-SAL-ARMY
• Text "STORM" to 51555
• Donate online at https://t.co/Tr6pwCDM4n pic.twitter.com/KYkx87gOBU

— Salvation Army USA (@SalvationArmyUS) August 25, 2017

Over the years, I have re-posted this far too many times: a few words about natural disasters and the human toll they take. I believe social media, writ large, make such events more personal to us all — a shared phenomena, even for those of us not on the scene.

When we start to see the images of these disasters, our first impulse is “go help.”

However, I’ve also learned from writing about these disasters (and having one occur in my hometown) that it’s always better to give the local citizens and experienced officials and non-government agencies a few days to address the immediate needs and to assess what the longer-term needs will be.

As I’ve written before, in the first days of any disaster, for those of us not on the scene, the best way we can help is always: first, send money.

This is especially true when a disaster is so widespread as Hurricane Harvey appears to be.

Personally, and because of advice I’ve been given by individuals who have been on the front lines of such disasters, I contribute, in a designated way, to the Salvation Army as it is supposed to be one of the most efficient ways to support first-responder, essential needs efforts.

Of course, there are many groups through which you can make such contributions.

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