office-dictation

Writing by Talking Instead of Typing

(What you’re about to read was dictated by me into a machine.)

Through the years, I’ve purchased numerous iterations of dictation software from the company now called Nuance. For some reason, dictating has never worked for me. Perhaps it’s because I was born after the Don Draper era. When I graduated from college, I could type 80 words a minute, which is probably faster than I can think. I can probably type faster than that now, but as anyone who has read this blog knows, the faster I type the more goofy things I say. And one of my rules of blogging is to not work over the text as much as I would if this were, say,  a final edit of something  that was going to be read by more than 12 people.  (I love you, but you’re the only one reading this.)

In other words, a lot of what you see on this blog is  more like a first draft  than any kind of finished writing.  Bottomline: I’ve always been able to type fast, so I never really learned how to dictate.

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Pictures___Photos_from_The_Interview__2014__-_IMDb 1

A Hands-free Review of the Interview

Note:  Due to hand surgery on Friday, my left hand is wrapped up in something that looks like a mitten and my arm is in a splint.  So I’m trying to write this item with dictation using the software Dragon Dictate. I’ve never been good with dictation but think that it will be better than one-handed typing so this is a Sunday afternoon practice run. Welcome to the first ever hands-free Rexblog post.


Not believing that it could be a movie worth investing a couple of hours of my life, I decided to wait until The Interview made it to Netflix before watching it. (It appeared there yesterday.)

Here’s my opinion: It’s funny in a Seth Rogen-James Franco inside-jokes you don’t get unless you have seen all their other bro-pack movies way. I’m aware enough of the references to get about  1/3rd of the jokes and to at least understand why 20-something- years-old guys might find the movie hilarious.

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maglev

New Clues for the Post-Cluetrain Era

“Markets are conversations.”

If you are an internet-marketing trivia master, you may recognize that quotation as Doc Searls’ prophetic observation that appeared 15 years ago as part of the Cluetrain Manifesto. Cluetrain began as a list of 95 theses posted on the website Cluetrain.com that captured the sentiments of Searls and three other tech-industry marketing veterans.

The Cluetrain Manifesto quickly evolved into a best-selling book that provided many early online marketers with a foundation for understanding and predicting how buying and selling would change when buyers have access to the same, or greater, data and insights previously controlled by sellers.

What would be different if a Cluetrain Manifesto-like list of observations, explanations and beliefs were created today? How would 15 years of reality override these prophecies?

We can now find out…

(Continue reading on the Hammock Blog.)