Jason Bourne Spoiler Alert

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Saw the new Jason Bourne movie. I can’t recall the name, but I think it’s “Now Playing.”

Can’t really explain what happens except people look at computer screens while eerie music plays. I get stressed out looking at computer screens every day, so I know how that feels.

In the movie, Jason Bourne no longer has amnesia. Or maybe he does. I’ve forgotten already.

If you go see the movie, within ten minutes of its ending, you’ll also have amnesia about anything in it that is remotely plot-like.

As I can’t recall the plot, here is one I just made up: In the movie, Jason Bourne is now a rogue killer assassin who is a travel writer on the side.

Fortunately, the creators of the movie knew people would forget everything about the movie so they named it Jason Bourne. If they had named it anything else, people would forget that also. Now, people just have to say, “the new Jason Bourne movie” assuming they had forgotten the movie name, but actually they haven’t.

Can’t wait to complain about the next sequel titled, “Latest Jason Bourne.”

God Bless Ameri Khans

What are the odds of there being two men named Khan who, in the same week, did amazing things to teach millions of people lessons about American history and government? And I’m not talking metaphorically. I’m talking actual history like the kind that is taught in lessons and books.

Here are the two Khans I’m talking about.

Sal Kahn, founder of Khan Academy

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In this photo, Sal and Kim Kutz, U.S. history fellow at Khan Academy, are celebrating the successful completion of an Indigogo project to raise funds for American government and politics resources. The project closed last week, raising $569,341 and crushing their goal of $300,000.

Here’s what is being funded by the project:

$300,000 | To create government and politics resources for high school students.
$200,000 | To fund Social Studies content for middle schoolers
$68,341 | To expand our content library to include more new topics.

“Together, we’ve raised funds to help us bring free resources on these critical topics to millions of learners. We truly couldn’t have done it without you,” Khan said on the Indigogo project page.

If you don’t know about Sal Khan and Khan Academy, the story is an amazing testament to the reason America is blessed to be a magnet for people from around the globe who yearn to breathe free in a land that promises opportunity. Khan is a second-generation American, born in Metairie, Louisiana. His father, Dr. Fakhrul Amin Khan, is from Barisal, Bangladesh, and his mother, Masuda Khan, is from Murshidabad, West Bengal, India. Sal and his elder sister were raised by his mother.

Khan attended MIT, graduating with degrees in mathematics, electrical engineering and computer science–Oh, and he was class president his senior year. Later, Khan earned MS degrees in electrical engineering and computer science and worked in an MBA from Harvard Business School during his spare time.

Khizr Khan. father of the late U.S. Army Capt. Humayun Khan

Amazon_Best_Sellers__Best_BooksMr. Khan not only spoke eloquently and with great impact, about the supreme sacrifice his son made in service to his country, Mr. Khan inspired a run on the sale of pocket-sized copies of the U.S. Constitution. For nearly a week, the Constitution has been the #2 best selling book of any type on Amazon.com — second only to a Harry Potter release.

 

 

What Pokemon Go Means for Assignment Editors


(NOTE: See also: What Brexit means for assignment editors.) 


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There is a term among those who study journalism called Afghanistanism that means, roughly, the practice of concentrating on problems in distant parts of the world while ignoring controversial local issues. There also is a term among those who study news websites that focus on writing recency-rich made-for-Google headlines  called, “What time is the Superbowl?” 

“What Pokemon Go means” and its variant, “What does Pokemon Go mean?” is a mix of these two “news value” factors: Attempts to take something remote to most of the real world (Pokemon Go} and localize its impact in order to show up in a Google news search.


What Pokemon Go means for |
retail
What Pokemon Go means for | women
What Pokemon Go means for | Nintendo
What Pokemon Go means for | the travel industry
What Pokemon Go means for | investors
What Pokemon Go means for | the next generation of iPhones
What Pokemon Go means for | business-to-business sales and marketing
What Pokemon means for | our augmented reality future
What Pokemon Go means for | venues and events

Presumptive

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In years’ past, I’ve heard the word presumptive used to describe a political party’s nominee during that period after the primaries have determined a winner, but before the convention delegates make it official.

But this year, it has seemed to be used so much during the past couple of months, that I decided to check Google Trends. Sure enough, it’s been a banner year the word presumptive.

I’ve been trying to recall what words were used in the past instead of presumptive. Likely? Assumed? Anticipated?

Perhaps the reason presumptive was googled so much this year was wishful thinking by people hoping the two presumptive nominees would change their minds and decide to run for office in another country.

Tony Schwartz Could Have Saved Civilization

trump-shadeJane Mayer’s New Yorker magazine piece about Tony Schwartz, ghost-writer of Trump’s book, Art of the Deal, is depressing.

While yes, it’s depressing to learn what Schwartz is revealing–that his 18 months of being embedded with Trump convinced him that Trump is a “sociopath”–that’s not what I’m talking about. Even his fans would probably admit he’s, well, “different,” when it comes to his personality. And, frankly, the word “sociopath” is not really a clinical term these days, if my TV crime-show training is correct. I think the “politically correct” term is antisocial personality disorder. But then, we know that Trump is not a fan of the politically correct.

Here’s what’s depressing: That Schwartz waited so long.

To Mayer, he admitted, “I put lipstick on a pig. I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is. I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

I don’t care that Schwartz now says he’s donated to charities his percentage of the proceeds from the books sold (a 50% cut) since Trump announced he was running for President.

I don’t care that Schwartz now says he hasn’t been able to sleep since then, as well.

I care that he has waited until Trump is one of only two people who will be our next President…and it has taken him over a year to share his unique insight with the rest of us, “that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

I’m sorry, but if someone thinks there is an “excellent possibility” that “the end of civilization” will occur if people don’t know what he knows, that person doesn’t have the liberty of sitting on such information for over a year–or several decades if one goes back to the original publishing date..

It may have meant something during all those rallies when Trump held up the book and claimed it was the best book ever written (except when he discovered the evangelical vote, he changed that to “second best after the Bible”).

Now it’s a little too late for Schwartz to ask for a Martin Niemöller-esque mulligan on saving civilization. You said nothing when it mattered most.

No, Mr. Schwartz, you were the boy with his finger in the dike.

You waited too long.

You could have saved civilization, but you blew it.

As I’ve written before, Trump backers won’t care.

They won’t believe Schwartz, now.

Even Trump knows he could take a gun out on 5th Avenue and start shooting people and his backers won’t care.

That’s why it’s depressing.