‘I Want to Know’ Moments & ‘I Want to Buy’ Moments

On Hammock’s Idea Blog, we’re discussing the two types of customer moments that marketers should prepare for by developing “content assets.” It’s similar to a concept in Hammock’s eBook Content Along the Customer Journey. Rather than thinking that marketing with content is a series of posts, tweets, likes, consider all the way content assests can be developed to reach customers at those times they want the information you can provide.

Google calls them:

1. I want to buy moments.
2. I want to know moments.

“I want to buy moments” are those situations where consumers have seen a TV ad or are trying to find the closest restaurant or drugstore. These are the moments for which consumers use Google most often.

“I want to know moments” are those situations where customers are doing research or product owners are trying to better understand something they’ve purchased. Because so many marketers don’t have the content that serves these customers’ “I want to know moments,” they’re turning to Google to find the answer.

Read more at Hammock.com’s Idea Blog

It’s not about the salt

Marketing gurus are calling this an advertising and content campaign.

Huh?

They’re calling it “branded music” too.

Huh?

Calling this content marketing because there’s a Morton’s salt ad at the end and it’s being released on YouTube is about as innovative as every video ever produced. (Remember, they are all created as a content marketing campaign to sell music.)

If a salt company wants to pay for product placement, they can do so, but don’t call it innovative marketing.

On the other hand, the video is spectacularly innovative.

And for the record, I just spent five minutes promoting this to the 12 people who read this blog.

Why Clinton Lost | Firewalls Don’t Work

Firewalls don’t work.

(Note: My “stay positive” attempt)

The most brilliant observation of the state of the nation was the SNL Black Jeopardy piece with Tom Hanks. People have described the election as being one of “insiders vs. outsiders” or “urban vs. rural.” There is truth to both of these observations (and the skit captures the urban vs. rural — spot on).

We live in a land of great diversity. It’s our strength. It’s one of the things that  makes us special.

But when you live in a land of diversity, it’s far too easy to hang labels on people because of our clichéd perceptions of them based on where they live or what they wear or the lifestyle they exhibit.

If I were running a major political party, I’d be looking at the world through the glasses of the Black Jeopardy / Tom Hanks filter and try to figure out how we can take the strength of America’s diversity to address the negative aspects of that diversity.

Clinton lost the election at the point where her frustration led her to say something that confirmed what the people who ultimately elected Trump believe: She views them as deplorable. (Granted, Trump said more heinous things in a day that most people will in a lifetime.)

Below, is a link to a recent Hammock Idea Email that explains the “backfire effect,” how presenting people with the facts can result in them not only disbelieving the facts, but will cause the result opposite of your intention.

Building firewalls around small groups is never the pathway to success. Finding ways to communicate how we are similar, when everything in our gut tells us we’re not, is the pathway to success.

Idea Email: What the Loyalty of Voters Teaches Us About Marketing

Prediction | Ten Ways Trump Will Explain Why He Didn’t Lose

I didn’t lose, Trump will say in as many ways as possible.

 


(Update, November 9, 2017: I have updated this item due to some news I became aware of after it was posted.)

Note: This was written and posted on November 7, 2016, one day before the end of the presidential campaign from Hell. For the record, I voted early for Hillary Clinton and would have voted for Robert Mugabe if my choices were limited to Donald Trump and him. I feel confident about two things: Trump will win Tennessee, so my vote will mean little in the Electoral College.


Ten Ways Trump Will Explain Why He Didn’t Lose After He Loses

  1. I didn’t lose. The Trump brand is yuge. The most valuable brand in the world. More than Coke and Apple put together. I know about these things.
  2. I didn’t lose. The campaign was a yuge profit deal.
  3. I didn’t lose. Historians are already saying I was the best presidential candidate ever.
  4. I didn’t lose. I spent half of what Hillary spent, and I would have won had the election not been rigged, so that’s winning. The Electoral College should consider that — the one who spends the least money should get bonus points from the Electoral College.
  5. I didn’t lose. The election was rigged by the media, the Republican Party insiders, the Clintons, Obamas, and Democrats, the FBI and CIA, ISIS, every newspaper in the U.S. except the one in Las Vegas. Readers Digest screwed us.
  6. I didn’t lose. I ran so that I could mention a Trump property whenever I spoke in a city where one was located. That way I could write off the visit as a marketing expense.
  7. I meant to lose. That’s how I didn’t lose.
  8. I didn’t lose. I’m going to sue everyone who didn’t vote for me and the damages I’ll win are going to be yuge.
  9. I didn’t lose. The Electoral College lost its accreditation, and now the election is decided by Trump University.
  10. I didn’t lose. Every Trump Hotel is booked solid for the next century and a half.

Maybe, Sorta, Kinda

At some point, a predictor must predict.

My friend Dave Winer suggests that the polling analysis website FiveThirtyEight.com is engaged in some link-spamming effort with an article carrying the headline, “Trump is just a normal polling error behind Clinton.”

I agree.

I’ve been fascinated with the challenges Nate Silver & Co. have faced in trying to convince an audience to stay engaged in a process that has been like a year-long version of the two weeks leading up to the Super Bowl.

In addition to trying of make the presidential election  a series of daily swings (who’s winning in Hillsborough County, Fla., today?), Silver and those sites that have tried to mimic his approach, all flunked the Republican Primary race–caution now permeates each article and podcast. Every few days, Silver runs a story on why anything that sounds definitive should be taken with a grain of salt.

Silver’s mea culpa after the Republican nominee set the stage for his summer and fall of providing endless butt-covering explanations of the many ways Trump could win, despite having only a 30% chance of doing so.

Silver’s most difficult challenge recently has been crafting new caveats.

But at some point, a predictor must predict.