Design___WIRED

About Wired.com’s New Page-Takeover Ad-Friendly Design

0DyrbUu_dxsPzzfMMoG3GmWNcQ3qhST2XVvCPK9xktsMy first post about a “homepage takeover” ad was seven years ago when the Wall Street Journal (WSJ.com) and the New York Times (NYTimes.com) sites ran what I thought then (and still do) was a brilliant ad. (But I didn’t know the technique had a name like “homepage takeover.”) I couldn’t believe what I was seeing, however, as the ad didn’t just take over the page, it mingled with the page — demonstrating some witty interplay with the 2008-era conventions of a news website.
While not as witty as the Apple example that interplayed with the web page context, over the years, the “homepage takeover” has evolved in a way that I notice often (due to me visiting the site more often, not necessarily because they  do it more than others) on IMDB.com. Continue reading

Modern Family’s ‘Connection Lost’ Episode as Allegory

No doubt, there are hundreds of posts this morning in which bloggers are trying to explain the top 10 this or that’s about the episode of Modern Family that aired last night (“Connection Lost,” Season 6, Episode 16).

For that reason, I haven’t read any blog posts regarding the show. If this sounds like I’m borrowing the observation of others, I’m actually not (this time, at least).

I did read one review and it was insightful (unlike this post, perhaps). It’s written by Gwen Ihnat at AV Club. She calls the episode, “A gimmicky but successful storytelling experiment.”

What you’re about to read is my observation of the show as an allegory (or parable, if you prefer).

SPOILER ALERT: I include some spoilers in this post, but I could tell you everything that happens and it wouldn’t matter.

Here are several things I won’t be writing about in this post

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Some Pinterest Users are Learning the Price of Free

Almost three years ago, to the day, I blogged about Pinterest users (and users of other social media platforms) understanding the reality that if you use a platform controlled by someone else, you are a hamster in their cage (a metaphor I first learned from Dave Winer).

The post I wrote three years ago, “Just Because You Can Make Money From Something, Doesn’t Mean You Should, and Other Rules of the Web,” was about Pinterest being accused of “skimming links” — the practice of finding links on their platform  that go to ecommerce sites and converting those links to affiliate links in order to generate commissions from those ecommerce companies.

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David Carr, Appreciation from a Blogger and Fan

This morning, there are countless remembrances of New York Times columnist David Carr, who died suddenly last night in Manhattan. Most are from the journalists with whom he worked, befriended and inspired.

While David Carr and I share a few professional friends and acquaintances, besides a couple of brief chats at SXSW functions or media conferences in New York (the kind that all blur together), I never knew him, knew him.

But this morning, I find myself feeling like I did know him in a way that long-ago bloggers (before we were told by experts that blogs were supposed to have a business model or fit into some SEO scheme) used to know one-another, especially if we blogged about overlapping topics.

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United_Record_Pressing_-_Pressing_nothing_but_vinyl_records_for_over_60_years_

A Couple of Grammy Day Nashville Music Stories You May Not Know

First, from Nashville’s public radio station, WPLN-FM, a story about United Record Pressing, LLC, the largest vinyl record-pressing plant in the country. “(We) account for about 30 to 40 percent of all vinyl records out there in stores,” says Jay Millar, United’s head of marketing,

Quote:

“United manufactures up to 40,000 records a day. Demand is so high that if you’re not already a customer, they won’t even take your order — at least until a second plant opens later this year.

“So how does a record get made? It starts with the groove.”

(Continue reading on WPLN.org…)

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