PacMan Eats Up Amazon’s Home Page

Earlier this year, I noted a new design of Wired.com that supports “takeover” ads. These are not pop-over or pop-up ads that you can click an “x” to remove. These are ads that are actually a part of the background or are, in some graphical and often animated way, an actual element of the page.

Today, I thought I saw Amazon come as close as I’ve seen it come to promoting a product using a takeover approach (that wasn’t a letter from Jeff Bezzos). However, upon looking at it more closely, I realized it was a standard size Amazon uses — a “slider” approach to promoting various products that someone viewing the site on a desktop screen will see. (I use lots of smaller screens, so seeing something on a big screen jumps out.)

2010 Google Doodle
2010 Google Doodle

Later: No wait. More than a takeover ad, this now reminds me of a Google Doodle from five years ago (left).

 

The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

I’m reading (and listening to) David McCullough’s wonderful new book, The Wright Brothers.

This isn’t a review, as I’ve only read about one-third of the book. But I’ve read enough to know that anyone who has ever has faced adversity and challenge and ridicule will recognize something familiar in the story. These brothers were from Dayton, Ohio, and funded the venture themselves. And besides, everyone know that no one would ever fly. Why? Because all of the big thinkers of the day said so.

Continue reading The First Photograph John T. Daniels Ever Took Was One of History’s Most Famous

Google Maps Lakeside View



In Nashville, a city that is in the midst of an unprecedented building boom, a prime piece of property has not participated in the boom. Instead, it became first, a giant hole and then, one of the most expensive lakes a person can imagine. However, Google Maps isn’t a person and it had no problem imagining it. Google Maps has spent the past several years codifying the creation of the giant lake on West End Avenue.

Continue reading Google Maps Lakeside View

How would you define your content strategy?

“Content is kind of a wanky term, which we have got to reframe. It’s commoditized, overused and misunderstood. (Our approach is) brand expression, it’s storytelling. What we’re trying to do is be topical, be loved, be endearing, be enduring and always, always try to surprise and delight. That’s the outcome we desire, what keeps us up at night and excited.”

Peter McGuinness
Chief Marketing Officer, Chobani
(via: Digiday)

Infographics vs. Explanation Graphics; No Contest

This week’s Idea Email at Hammock.com looks at the disconnect between the role infographics played during the late 1970s and 1980s and the role played today by what are called infographics. The idea places special emphasis on the use by infographics pioneer Nigel Holmes of the term “explanation graphics.”

Quote:

“In the past, the term infographics referred to a style of visual storytelling that sought to make the complex simple and the confusing comprehensible. Today, infographics is a term applied to a style of illustration that often displays bullet points of simple and familiar facts using quickly clichéd clip art and fat-lettered fonts. A better approach—that both serves customers and is shareable—is to use graphics that explain, interpret, teach and provide customers with a deeper understanding of something important to them.

Continue reading on Hammock.com: Stop Using Infographics; Start Using Explanation Graphics