gapingvoid_winer

How Millennials (Not Al Gore) Invented the Internet

Editor’s Note

For this post, the term Millennial refers to people born between 1982 and 2004. (Math help: People who are currently (i.e., 2014) between the ages of 10 and 32.) Also, while this post refers to a golden age, NOTHING in it refers to fringe New Testament apocalyptic theology.

Introduction

During the first part of the 20th century, the french philosopher and sociologist Maurice Halbwachs advanced the idea of “collective memory” — a shared pool of information held in the memories of two or more members of a group. Or at least that’s what a group of two or more members of a group of people wrote in the Maurice Halbwachs Wikipedia entry.

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The History of Content Marketing: Nashville Bicycle Messenger, 1910

Nashville, November 1910. “George Christopher, Postal Telegraph messenger #7, fourteen years old. Been at it over three years. Does not work nights.”

The photograph and caption are both by Lewis Wickes Hine, who took thousands of portraits of young bicycle messengers and other child laborers on behalf of the Nation Child Labor Committee at the turn of the 20th century. Hine’s photos, and the work of the committee, are credited with influencing public opinion to the degree that in 1916, Congress passed legislation protecting children: the Keating-Owen Act.

The Library of Congress photographic collections house more than five thousand original Lewis Hine photographs, given to the library by the National Child Labor Committee.

(via: Veloaficionado)

IdeaEmailmerry-go-round

Direct-to-customer media was the promise of the internet. What happened?

From the current Hammock Idea Email: “As a marketer, you should be focused first and foremost on developing media and content that serve your customers, that add value to your products by helping fulfill the promise made when the customer purchased them. Everything else, all the social media and SEO investment, should be viewed as support for the only media you own and control: the content that connects you directly to your customer.”

(Continue reading: “Idea: Don’t Rein In New Marketing Opportunities
With an Old Marketing Strategy”…
)

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How Apple Masters “The Prestige”

The current Hammock Idea Email is about what you can learn about Apple’s new product launch magic by ignoring the products Apple unveils on Tuesday and focusing, rather, on how they handle the “third act” of any trick, “The Prestige”:

Next Tuesday, Apple will hold one of its famous new product unveilings. If you want to learn why Apple is the master of such unveilings, here’s our advice: Ignore the products they launch. Concentrate instead on watching Apple’s mastery of “The Prestige.”

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Sidenote related to obscure blogging thing: After drafting the Idea Email (the emails are collaborative and written by several people, but this one started with my draft), I Google’d to see if there was anyone I should credit with using the film, “The Prestige,” in describing Apple’s unveiling practices. When I saw that my longtime blogging friend M.G. Siegler used the film in September, 2012, I added that credit to the draft (although he concluded “the turn” is what Apple masters, not the prestige). Later in fact-checking, we discovered that on RexBlog, I had used the film The Prestige in an Apple-related post even earlier (in June, 2009) than M.G.’s (or ParisLemon’s) post. After reading and writing thousands of posts, it all cooks down to cajun gumbo that, if lucky, is both familiar but that still has a little surprise kick to it (a metaphor I’m sure hundreds of bloggers have used).