A Good Day for Nashville

(Note: I posted this originally for friends on my Facebook account, but decided I should add it here so that one day, when I forget where I posted it, it will be here.)

For those of you who do not live in Nashville, the following item is about a mayoral election we had yesterday — the culmination of a year-long (or longer) campaign between seven candidates in which incredibly large amounts of money were spent by most of the candidates. We now have a run-off between two candidates who, in my opinion, would both would be great mayors.

I am relieved this morning, knowing that Nashville’s next mayor will be one of two people who I am convinced are thoughtful, committed and smart people. While they will both use labels to define the other candidate, they both fit in the mold of the recent mayors who have served the city well.

Fortunately, we had a field of candidates who could have also fit that bill.
I feel certain that if I polled those who are my friends who live in Nashville (both the Facebook kind and the kind who I have dinner with on the weekends), I would discover that most supported one of the two run-off candidates.

Some of my closest, long-time friends are even playing key roles in the campaigns of both of the two candidates. (I also have close friends who worked on several of the other campaigns, as well.)

And one of the candidates is a long-time friend.

I am going to attempt to keep my Facebook account a runoff-free zone, but today, I think it’s a good day for Nashville’s future.

Competitive Outrage

I haven’t commented on the outrage of the week, the killing of Zimbabwe’s “most beloved lion,” Cecil, by a big game hunting dentist from Minnesota named Walter Palmer.

By the time I was aware of the Cecil killing, the internet outrage was far more than anything I could come up with, so I passed even tweeting about it. Besides, the only thing I could think of to say that I hadn’t seen before was how white the dentist’s teeth were — obviously, a Photoshop job.

The competitive nature of internet outrage is fascinating.

Continue reading Competitive Outrage

Why Google+ Failed: It Was a Pigpen Product, Not a Lucy Product

lucygoogle-20101112-053016pigpengoogle-20101112-053824Because I’ve blogged a rather long time, I now have the privilege to point back to things written long ago (as history is so prone to repeat itself).

For instance, five years ago, I shared my theory that the products Google constantly releases fall into two categories: the “Lucy Google” product or the “Pigpen Google” product.

I point to that earlier post because of the failure of Google+ as a product (but a failure that contains many products that IMHO, once freed from the social networking shackles of Google+ will be successful),

Continue reading Why Google+ Failed: It Was a Pigpen Product, Not a Lucy Product