‘I Want to Know’ Moments & ‘I Want to Buy’ Moments

On Hammock’s Idea Blog, we’re discussing the two types of customer moments that marketers should prepare for by developing “content assets.” It’s similar to a concept in Hammock’s eBook Content Along the Customer Journey. Rather than thinking that marketing with content is a series of posts, tweets, likes, consider all the way content assests can be developed to reach customers at those times they want the information you can provide.

Google calls them:

1. I want to buy moments.
2. I want to know moments.

“I want to buy moments” are those situations where consumers have seen a TV ad or are trying to find the closest restaurant or drugstore. These are the moments for which consumers use Google most often.

“I want to know moments” are those situations where customers are doing research or product owners are trying to better understand something they’ve purchased. Because so many marketers don’t have the content that serves these customers’ “I want to know moments,” they’re turning to Google to find the answer.

Read more at Hammock.com’s Idea Blog

Customers Don’t Want Your Content

Key to content marketing: help customers become smarter.

While lots of people (including me) call it “content marketing,” I’ve yet to meet anyone who says they want content. Contentment, yes, but content?

People want knowledge, insight, expertise, wisdom, to laugh, to be entertained.

People want to know how to move a Google doc into a Google Drive folder or help in deciding which among 20 different paper shredders should they buy or where’s the closest place they can order breakfast food for supper.

People want to learn new things, lose weight, be better at bocce, or know what bocce is or have someone explain to them  how no-one they know likes Donald Trump but he leads in the polls.

florida-whiteboardGive people such knowledge and you won’t need to pay for expensive infographics. (The late Tim Russert didn’t need high-tech graphics to make people smarter.)

So here’s how to become great at using content to increase revenues, create long-term customer relationships and many other things you’d rather tell the boss about that how many pieces of content you’ve posted:

Stop thinking about this thing where companies use content in their marketing as “content” or “marketing.” Focus  rather on developing as many ways as possible that enable you to help your customers become smarter.

They’ll love you and you’ll become marketer of the year.


(Sidenote: Whenever I write something like this, I feel the need to credit Doc Searls. He makes me smarter all the time.)