Dreamland’s Rhonda Gets the Conversation Started

Rhonda represents the marketing manager who frequently attends conferences or workshops about various forms of online media.

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Netflix is streaming the Australian TV comedy Utopia (due to copyright issues, it is titled Dreamland in the UK, Canada, and US). While it is not a parody documentary (mockumentary), in some ways it is similar to The Office with over-the-top clichéd characters representing the spectrum of incompetence one finds in any bureaucracy of workers — especially within a bureaucracy that is comprised of lots of people who don’t actually know what the goals of the organization are. Shows like this work because there are always a character or two who actually do understand the difference in the substance and the fluff of any organization. It is through their eyes we see the world in which they exist; the world that can, at times, remind us of our own.

Like Silicon Valley, the HBO comedy about a tech startup, the/Dreamland writers are spot-on in capturing the techish-marketing-buzz-speak vocabulary of the mid-2010’s. The creative key to both shows is having the purpose of the organizations be recognizable and somewhat accurate to viewers who work in those fields, while having the personalities and interactions of the characters be recognizable universally.

As you can see from the clip below, Rhonda represents the marketing manager who frequently attends conferences or workshops about various forms of online media. She returns to the office enthusiastically and doggedly drawing priorities away from important projects to superficial online projects.

She is awesome.

How to Move to Canada

The chart below is the past week’s Google trend graph for U.S. Google users searching the phrase, “how to move to canada”?

The turning point is three days ago, Super Tuesday (3.2.2016), the day people who were still skeptical of the chances of Donald Trump winning the GOP presidential nomination, went from skeptical to hysterical.

I’m guessing that an American who must Google, “How to Move to Canada” needs other answers to questions like, “Do they have running water in Canada?” or “What language do they speak in Canada?” or “Where exactly is Canada?”

As a helpful aide, I found these on the inter-web. A map that answers the question, “Where’s Canada?”:

WHERE IS CANADApng

Nutqarrit_-_Stop_sign_in_CYCBI also found this recent movie from Canada where a park ranger and a park visitor (just guessing, however) are singing what is perhaps Canada’s national anthem. So yes, they speak english. (However, they have another language on their traffic signs, French, I think, but I have no idea what nutoarrit means in french..)

(P.S. I love Canada. )

Newest Guilty Pleasure: Documentary Now

Full-length first episode of the new IFC’s Documentary Now.

This is a full-length episode of IFC’s new Documentary Now. While this is the first season, in the show they are celebrating it as their 50th anniversary season.

Only thing I needed to hear was Fred Amisen and Bill Hader.

This episode: Think Nova meets Portlandia meets Vice, but primarily the latter two. Classic: Helen Mirren’s PBS-esque opening. Other episodes satirize other documentary clichés.

More clips from the show found here.

Warning: Probably not for those who don’t understand the phrase, “Portlandia meets Vice.”

John Oliver Hates April Fools Day as Much as I Do

This year, John Oliver played a trick on the internet. He taped a rant against April Fools Day and posted it on YouTube.

The 12 people who read this blog know how much I don’t like April 1 on the internet. It’s the day when people who aren’t funny on the internet try hard to pretend they are funny on the internet.

What results is me using a term one rarely hears except to describe humor on April Fools Day: ham-handed.

The saddest example of this was in the early days of TechCrunch when each year, the day would start with some news item about one company purchasing another company for some reason that made no sense. As a different version of that same “prank” appeared in TechCrunch each year, the only thing funny about it was how unfunny it was.

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