Rolling ’round Nashville

Skip this post if you were expecting something other than a Nashville bike infrastructure update.

Over the weekend, I took some photos of a couple of Nashville bike- and walk-friendly projects that have been planned for years but are now “for-real.” If you’re not interested in Nashville bicycle infrastructure, don’t feel lonely. One of this blog’s 12 readers is bound to find Nashville’s bike and walking infrastructure a riveting topic.

I-440 Greenway (Construction-Phase 1)

This set of photos (embedded from my Flickr account where each photo is annotated) are of the first phase of a stretch of greenway that runs adjacent to Nashville’s “inner-loop,” I-440. Even life-long Nashvillians would be challenged to know where the photos of the underpass are located, so I’ve embedded a Google Map below the photos. This section goes from Murphy Road to Centennial Park. The “magic” part of this greenway that few people with find hard to believe is the under-pass that goes under 440 rather than over it (like the current Acklen Park Ave. Bridge). When the greenway is completed, it will become a popular, safe and family-friendly bike/walk route to Centennial Park and the Vanderbilt area from neighborhoods west and north of this greenway (especially after the graffiti is removed).

I-440 Greenway Construction | 2017

Where the heck is this?

One the map, the bike icon is the location of the underpass.

Division Street Extender

I added a photo of Froogal McDoogals (a liquor store that anchors one end of the bridge) so that Nashvillians could quickly vector in on the location. For urban transportation wonks, the design of the bridge is called a Complete Street or “multimodal.” This simply means that the street was conceived as a passage not only for people driving cars but also with designated and protected lanes for people on bicycles and people walking. And when I say, “protected,” I don’t mean the white plastic separators going up around town (which I’m all for), but I’m referring to the metal kind you can see in the photos. The bridge and the approaches on each end are designed to connect “the Gultch” to Second Avenue, nearby the Music City Center.

Nashville | Division Street Bridge

Malcolm Gladwell Just Provided the Tipping Point to My Understanding of Country Music

Now I know the ingredients of a tear jerking country song.

I’ve lived in Nashville for almost 40 years, but I’ve learned more about country music in the past 40 minutes than I had in all those years.

The current episode of Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, Revisionist History, is titled “King of Tears.” It centers on a talk Gladwell had in Nashville recently with legendary songwriter Bobby Braddock, now in his 70s. (Minor spoiler: He’s the person being referenced to in the title of the episode.

You may not know who Braddock is, but you’ll be tracking down all of the songs he wrote by the time the podcast episode ends.

While the short version of what Kings of Tears is about is this: Gladwell seeks and finds out, “What it is about some kinds of that makes us cry.”

I finally have an answer to those questions.

Just listen.

Here is a link to “King of Tears.”

(Sidenote: The Revisionist History website includes links to a couple of books Gladwell refers to in the episode and provides links to the various ways you can subscribe to future episodes.)

For my Nashville Walking and Biking Friends

Bookmark this on your iPhone so you’ll be a tap away from complaining at all times.

I used to complain about stuff in my head. Then someone on the Nashville Walking & Biking Email Group sent this list out and I tried calling someone up and telling them about the issue. Amazingly, it worked. P.S. Here’s the link to that email group. I’m one of the people who manages it, so contact me if you feel the need to complain about the list. Call these people to complain about everything else.

Report a sidewalk or bike lane maintenance issue

If you encounter a sidewalk or bike lane in need of maintenance, please let Metro Public Works know by calling (615) 862-8750 or filing a report online at https://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Forms/Request-Customer-Service.aspx

Report a greenway or trail maintenance issue

Please share greenway maintenance requests with the parks department by calling Metro Parks at (615) 862-8400 or emailing MetroParks@nashville.gov

Report issues with temporarily closed sidewalks and bikeways

Please report any issues with sidewalk and bike lane closures due to construction or special events to the Metro Public Works Permit Office by calling (615) 862-8782 or emailing pwpermits@nashville.gov

Report signs or overgrown vegetation blocking public right of way

Please report any signs or vegetation blocking sidewalks or bike lanes to Metro Public Works know by calling (615) 862-8750 or filing a report online at https://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Forms/Request-Customer-Service.aspx

Report an aggressive driver

If you are harassed or endangered by an aggressive driver while walking or biking, please file a report with Metro Nashville Police Department’s Aggressive Driving Unit online at https://www.nashville.gov/Police-Department/Online-Services/Report-Aggressive-Driver.aspx

Report people who park illegally in bike lanes and sidewalks

You can report drivers who are illegally parked on sidewalks and in bike lanes to the Metro Police Department non emergency line at (615) 862-8600 or online at https://www.nashville.gov/Police-Department/Contact-Us.aspx

Request traffic enforcement

If you have concerns about speeding or other traffic violations, you can request an enforcement operation. For more information, visit http://www.nashville.gov/Services/Frequently-Asked-Question-Center/FAQ-Details/ID/198/How-Do-I-Request-Police-Radar-or-Traffic-Enforcement-Near-My-Home

Report Issues with Public Transit

If you have questions or concerns about transit connections, placement of bus stops, or issues around accessibility.
http://www.nashvillemta.org/Nashville-MTA-customer-comments.asp

Nashville, an Observation

google_fiber

(Updated: See at bottom) I am merely an observer of these things, okay, but….

Tonight, the Nashville/Davidson County Commission has the chance to both de-criminalize the possession of a small amount of marijuana and reject an ATT/Comcast anti-Google Fiber effort. (Note: For those who are stumbling upon this post, I live in Nashville.)

While I’m merely an observer, let me observe this: When  national media refer to Nashville as the “it city,” this is what they are talking about. (If both measures pass, that is.)

Oh, and another mere observation.

Other than people who work for ATT and Comcast and their families, I can’t think of two companies that people complain about more.

Most civilians, however, love the Google.

“We have Google fiber” is definitely has ‘it city’ cred.

BONUS: I am more than an observer of this. It’s a list of the 50 best bicycle cities in the U.S. Know what city isn’t included? Nashville. There are at least 50 cities (and lots more) that have better bicycle paths and infrastructure and support than Nashville.

That is how a city loses its “it city” cred.

(Updated, 10:30 p.m.)

Nashville/Davidson County Metro Council just voted 35-3 to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana. You read that correctly: 35-3. While I’m sure our whacky state legislature will try to override it, this is one of those measures that obviously has legs.

Earlier in the meeting, the council voted by a voice vote to reject Comcast’s and ATTs transparent efforts to squash Google Fiber.

Both Comcast and ATT (neither of which had plans for gigabyte internet when Google Fiber announced their plans) warned Metro they were going to sue if they lost tonight.

While I’m not a lawyer, I do know that both ATT and Comcast exist in their current conglomerated fashions because the Department of Justice were promised in all sorts of ways that their two mergers wouldn’t be harmful to competition.

I’m sure there will be plenty of fodder in those two DOJ decisions — with lots of promises that will not be helpful in their efforts to kill Google Fiber.

But that’s just a guess by someone who is merely passing this along.

Last note: This is the first time in the nearly 40 years I’ve lived in Nashville that I’ve actually watched a Metro Council meeting.

When, Where to Vote Early in the Nashville Run-off Election, 2015

How, when and where to vote early in Nashville’s run-off election, 2015.

(via Hammock.com) Nashville is having a run-off election to determine who its next mayor and several metro council members will be. Election Day is September 10, but early voting began last Friday. To find out exactly where and when early voting takes place, the Nashville.gov website sends you to the Davidson County Election Commission’s webpage. voting-sked-beforeThere you can download a PDF of a page filled with SHOUTING-OUT ALL-CAPS listing the time the polls will close. (See accompanying image.) Yikes! Rather than complain, some folks at Hammock decided to create something we could share in the office that makes it a little clearer when and where one can vote early. Thinking we’re not the only confused voters, we then decided we’d share it here with anyone who would like to use it. We’re not trying to get you to vote for a specific candidate. We’re just trying to get you to vote.

(Click: for a Large JPG)
(Click: for a PDF)

early-voting
(Feel free to share, even adapt, this. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.)

*Nashville and Davidson County were merged into one municipality in 1963, so any references to county or city mean the same thing.