A Good Day for Nashville


(Note: I posted this originally for friends on my Facebook account, but decided I should add it here so that one day, when I forget where I posted it, it will be here.)

For those of you who do not live in Nashville, the following item is about a mayoral election we had yesterday — the culmination of a year-long (or longer) campaign between seven candidates in which incredibly large amounts of money were spent by most of the candidates. We now have a run-off between two candidates who, in my opinion, would both would be great mayors.


I am relieved this morning, knowing that Nashville’s next mayor will be one of two people who I am convinced are thoughtful, committed and smart people. While they will both use labels to define the other candidate, they both fit in the mold of the recent mayors who have served the city well.

Fortunately, we had a field of candidates who could have also fit that bill.
I feel certain that if I polled those who are my friends who live in Nashville (both the Facebook kind and the kind who I have dinner with on the weekends), I would discover that most supported one of the two run-off candidates.

Some of my closest, long-time friends are even playing key roles in the campaigns of both of the two candidates. (I also have close friends who worked on several of the other campaigns, as well.)

And one of the candidates is a long-time friend.

I am going to attempt to keep my Facebook account a runoff-free zone, but today, I think it’s a good day for Nashville’s future.

Three things I’ve learned from blogging for the past 15 years

These things also come from just being around for a lot longer than 15 years.

I post them today after seeing reports of a controversy that is strange, only because it’s in Nashville, my home for the past four decades. Dueling tech conference organizers are quite common in other places.

While I am not attending either conference, in brief, here’s what happened. A locally organized conference was the scene yesterday of some trash talk by a country music star (who is very smart and is a savvy business person, but whose schtick and music is of the bro-country genre) and a successful tech entrepreneur who loves to shock people by using lots of profanity when speaking before groups (disclosure: I like this person, but don’t endorse his approach to panel talk).

As the target of the trash talk was a Tennessee native who is now a well-known tech journalist and media entrepreneur, it didn’t take long for her to let the dogs out.

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Google Maps Lakeside View



In Nashville, a city that is in the midst of an unprecedented building boom, a prime piece of property has not participated in the boom. Instead, it became first, a giant hole and then, one of the most expensive lakes a person can imagine. However, Google Maps isn’t a person and it had no problem imagining it. Google Maps has spent the past several years codifying the creation of the giant lake on West End Avenue.

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A Couple of Grammy Day Nashville Music Stories You May Not Know

First, from Nashville’s public radio station, WPLN-FM, a story about United Record Pressing, LLC, the largest vinyl record-pressing plant in the country. “(We) account for about 30 to 40 percent of all vinyl records out there in stores,” says Jay Millar, United’s head of marketing,

Quote:

“United manufactures up to 40,000 records a day. Demand is so high that if you’re not already a customer, they won’t even take your order — at least until a second plant opens later this year.

“So how does a record get made? It starts with the groove.”

(Continue reading on WPLN.org…)

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How John Seigenthaler Changed Wikipedia

John Seigenthaler, the legendary editor of Nashville’s daily newspaper, The Tennessean, died yesterday (Friday, July 11, 2014) in his Nashville home. In addition to recounting his remarkable career in journalism and public service, an event nine years ago that’s now referred to by early contributors to Wikipedia as “the Wikipedia Seigenthaler incident” earned a paragraph in Mr. Seigenthaler’s New York Time’s obituary.

As a Nashvillian and admirer of Mr. Seigenthaler for decades, I was angered in 2005 by that thoughtless and vulgar prank that became one of the most controversial episodes in the early history of the online user-contributed encyclopedia. In hindsight, the prank and following events led to much needed changes by those who created and fostered the early development of Wikipedia.
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