Why Trump Doesn’t Tweet About the Olympics or Polls

Just because.

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Why Trump Doesn’t Tweet About the Olympics

“The Olympics is about the worst thing that could have happened to the Trump train. Here’s a candidate whose message depends entirely on convincing Americans that they’re living in a failing nation overrun by criminal immigrants. And for the past two weeks, tens of millions of Americans have been glued to a multi-ethnic parade of athletes, winning easily. “Make America Great Again” has never felt more out-of-touch than it does against the backdrop of tenacious, over-achieving American athletes driven by their own journeys in pursuit of the American Dream.”

VIA | Politico.com

Trump Isn’t Tweeting About The Polls Anymore

“Trump rarely tweets about polls these days. Indeed, he’s done so only four times in the past 30 days. During the same period in the primary season — as far out from the Iowa caucuses as we are from Election Day now — he tweeted about polls 103 times.”

mehtaenten-trump-twitter-1

VIA | FiveThirtyEight.com

Tony Schwartz Could Have Saved Civilization

trump-shadeJane Mayer’s New Yorker magazine piece about Tony Schwartz, ghost-writer of Trump’s book, Art of the Deal, is depressing.

While yes, it’s depressing to learn what Schwartz is revealing–that his 18 months of being embedded with Trump convinced him that Trump is a “sociopath”–that’s not what I’m talking about. Even his fans would probably admit he’s, well, “different,” when it comes to his personality. And, frankly, the word “sociopath” is not really a clinical term these days, if my TV crime-show training is correct. I think the “politically correct” term is antisocial personality disorder. But then, we know that Trump is not a fan of the politically correct.

Here’s what’s depressing: That Schwartz waited so long.

To Mayer, he admitted, “I put lipstick on a pig. I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is. I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

I don’t care that Schwartz now says he’s donated to charities his percentage of the proceeds from the books sold (a 50% cut) since Trump announced he was running for President.

I don’t care that Schwartz now says he hasn’t been able to sleep since then, as well.

I care that he has waited until Trump is one of only two people who will be our next President…and it has taken him over a year to share his unique insight with the rest of us, “that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

I’m sorry, but if someone thinks there is an “excellent possibility” that “the end of civilization” will occur if people don’t know what he knows, that person doesn’t have the liberty of sitting on such information for over a year–or several decades if one goes back to the original publishing date..

It may have meant something during all those rallies when Trump held up the book and claimed it was the best book ever written (except when he discovered the evangelical vote, he changed that to “second best after the Bible”).

Now it’s a little too late for Schwartz to ask for a Martin Niemöller-esque mulligan on saving civilization. You said nothing when it mattered most.

No, Mr. Schwartz, you were the boy with his finger in the dike.

You waited too long.

You could have saved civilization, but you blew it.

As I’ve written before, Trump backers won’t care.

They won’t believe Schwartz, now.

Even Trump knows he could take a gun out on 5th Avenue and start shooting people and his backers won’t care.

That’s why it’s depressing.

Not So Smart

Donald Trump can say anything and won’t lose voters. To win in November, however, he must appeal to new voters.

Yesterday, the NYTimes reported that during a conference call with former governors and senators, Trump described some of his campaign team as being “not so smart” for suggesting his supporters should stop criticizing Federal Judge Gonzalo Curiel (judge in the Trump University class action case) and stop blaming the Indiana native’s Mexican heritage as the reason he released previously sealed documents related to the case.

Rebuking his staff–and the long list of Republicans “leaders” who have begrudgingly endorsed him but immediately tried to run from him when he started attacking the judge–Trump said they all should keep claiming Judge Curiel is against Trump because Curiel’s parents are from Mexico. Trump instructed his followers (and endorsers?) to keep accusing reporters of being “racists” for asking questions

Quote in the NYTimes.com:

It was a breathtaking display of Mr. Trump’s belittlement of his own team on a call with former governors and senators, as well as others supporting his candidacy.

I understand–at least in theory–that people of all beliefs have cognitive biases that are nearly impossible to dislodge. Their beliefs are so embedded they react to any challenge to their way of thinking with a “backfire effect”–they dig their heels in even more.

But when Trump rebukes and belittles his staff and the elected officials who are the “boots on the ground” of a presidential election–because they won’t ignore the Constitution they’ve sworn to protect and defend–it is time to accept the fact that he is exploring new territory of the absurd.

Of all the unbelievable things  Donald Trump has said during the past few months, one of them is now believable. He said it in January, before the Iowa caucus:

“I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters.”

Donald Trump can say anything and won’t lose voters. To win in November, however, he must appeal to new voters. I don’t believe he can attract enough to be elected President. Or, perhaps I am exhibiting a cognitive bias by believing that.

Or maybe I’m just not so smart.

Hey, What About All Those Trump Magazines That Failed?

I was starting to believe the magazine industry was being ripped off.

Until the past weekend, I hadn’t seen any Trump branded magazines among the many lists of Trump failures appearing. I recalled some as I blogged about them nine years ago.

Even better, my friend Dylan Stableford, now covering the campaign for Yahoo News, was back then at the trade magazine Folio: and in 2007, was already covering the parade of Trump magazine failures.

Trump Style | Started in 1997, Failed circa 2004
Trump World | Started in 2004, Failed 2007
Trump Magazine | Started in 2007, Failed circa 2009

There has probably been more Trump magazines launched (and failed).
I know just who to ask. Oh, Mr. Magazine?

P.S. This feels like the early days of this blog.