An Early Content Marketing Pioneer Rebels Against Some Of The Modern Forms

Rex Hammock has been recognized for decades as a leading voice in content marketing.

As the 12 readers of this blog know by now, I’ve been working on being rebellious for a long, long time. Tony Silber’s feature on Forbes.com regarding some of my radical thoughts on content marketing is helping me on my quest. ;  )

Here’s the beginning of the piece with a link to the entire article:

Rex Hammock, founder and owner of an eponymous content-marketing agency, has through longevity and thought leadership been recognized for decades as a leading voice in content marketing, a term Hammock himself has little use for.

In addition to high-profile membership in a variety of industry associations, where his counsel drove and early awareness and understanding of content marketing, Hammock has published an influential blog since 2000, where he led a broad conversation on media and web publishing.

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Return of the “Available Next Year” Flying Car

This year is the 10th anniversary of 2008, the year we were supposed to see flying cars in the sky.

(HT: @BillHudge)

The 12 loyal readers of this blog know that a decade ago, during the year 2008, I decided to blog about a random topic for reasons I can’t exactly recall. The topic I decided to follow was “flying cars.” This was before self-driving cars had become a thing and before @realdonaldtrump had a Twitter account — in other words, the golden age of everything good.

By the end of that year, I had written 50 items — mostly short Tweet-like items. The best part of the exercise was that it spawned a small cadre (you 12) of flying car scouts who were far better than Google Alert at pointing me to news items on the topic.

In December 2008, I tried my best to declare an end to the experiment by posting a year-end “Top 10 Stories about Flying Cars in 2008 ” that once every few years still earns me a visit from some self-flying enthusiast either thanking or trolling me.

However, despite my efforts to escape the flying car beat, one specific brand of flying car (or, at that time, a “roadable aircraft”) has never gone away.

It was from a company called Terrafugia in Woburn, Massachusetts, or, “the little flying car that couldn’t say no.” (My suggested slogan, not their’s.)

In 2008, Terrafugia said its “roadable aircraft” would go on sale later in 2008 — “cruising you smoothly on the road and through the sky.” But, alas, 2008 came and went, along with 2009 and 2010 and 2011. (I did receive this comic strip update that year, however.)

In 2014, Bloomberg had a feature about Terrafugia with some awesome video supplied by the company and amazingly similar to their 2013 video. And their delivery date was “sometime between January 2015 and March 2016.”

All of that background to say that my #1 flying car scout just pointed me to news in the Daily Mail that reports “the world’s first flying car is set to go on the market with pre-sales scheduled to begin next month…According to manufacturer Terrafugia, which belongs to the parent company of Volvo, the Transition can fly up to 400 miles (640km) at top speeds of 100mph (160kmh).”

Okay, so let’s review: In 2008, the roadable aircraft from Terrafugia was due out the following year, which, according to some quick math, was ten years before today’s year, 2018.

But I’m still a believer because the Terrafugia company actually was purchased by the parent company of Volvo. And since I’m an owner of a Volvo, I’m hoping for some type of trade in allowance around 2020.

Embedded Photography from Getty (Free to Use)

I’ve mentioned this before, but here’s a great source of photography if you have a non-commercial blog or website.

GettyImages will allow you to embed their photos on your site. It’s like YouTube for photography.

Here’s how it works.

Here’s how it looks:
(Update: For some reason, it’s not working in Chrome according to one of the 12 viewers of this site.)

Embed from Getty Images

Note: RexBlog is my personal (and very-non-commercial) blog.However, the company Hammock Inc. (Hammock.com) has a usage and rights plan with GettyImages that is totally unrelated to this blog.

Interesting Pew Survey (2016 vs 2018)

Interesting data for political stats wonks.


(Update: Also see, “How Broad and How Happy Is the Trump Coalition?” Nate Cohn’s article mentioned below.)


Here are some fascinating Pew Research survey findings in the run-up to the “mid-year” 2018 election and backward look at 2016.

Why is it interesting?

The 2018 findings are from a tracking poll of the same individuals who participated in the 2016 Pew American Trends Panel. In other words, the same people who participated in 2016 also participated in this year’s panel. (Let me try again: It’s not a random sampling. It’s a survey of the same people who participated in 2016.)

While the write-up of the Pew findings is comprehensive, today’s NYT “The Daily” podcast has guest Nate Cohn of @UpshotNYT diving deep into the role of educated suburban women in both the 2016 and 2018 races.

Bottomline

Before this survey, the conventional wisdom has been that a core of “uneducated white rural male voters” is the key to Trump’s 2016 victory. While the Pew survey concurs that that demographic was a key member of the Trump “core,” it also reveals that educated women in the suburbs who were against Hillary Clinton were what sealed the deal for Trump. And, as this Pew chart shows, this cohort is the most likely voter to have become disenchanted with Trump.