John Battelle searches the future

John Battelle searches the future, and this is what he finds: In his annual display of his extraordinarily prescient brilliance, once more John Battelle puts it all out there for the world to see (and refer-back-to later). Here’s his list of some things he believes “have a reasonable chance of occurring in 2005 with regard to the intersection of media, technology, and search.” (Yesterday, he recapped last year’s predictions, and he did pretty good.)

More on the Tennessean’s hopelessly misdirected investigative journalism targeting country music fans

More on the Tennessean’s hopelessly misdirected investigative journalism targeting country music fans: Someone e-mailed me to ask what I thought about yesterday’s follow-up story to the Tennessean “faux controversy” story I blogged Sunday.

What do you think I think? Yesterday’s story is merely a rehash of the original non-story. This time, the reporter gathers some quotes from leaders of other artist’s fan clubs who say the Chely Wright fans, “went too far.” Agreed. They went too far. Hasn’t treating them like members of al-kadhi on the front page of the Sunday Tennessean sort of made that point already?

Here’s a better story for the Tennessean reporter to pursue. I think she should do an expose on the reasons behind why no Tennessean reporters covered the Nashville payola scandal earlier this year involving WQZQ that even a best-selling author writing for the New Yorker covered (thanks to Mr. Roboto for that link). Why are over-enthusiastic fans worth investigating and a blatantly corrupt radio industry not? Does the lack of coverage of that payola scandal have anything to do with the Tennessean having an entertainment columnist on the payroll of that station? Not to suggest that any of this is scandalous, but it’s at least worth asking the presidents of some fan clubs about.

Just for the record, that is what I do for a living

Just for the record, that is what I do for a living: When I see an article like the one in today’s New York Times that makes it appear that the century-old practice of custom(er) publishing is something new, it makes me realize that my work has just begun. That companies (and associations, government agencies, military branches, churches, schools, etc.) are creating web (and print) properties that aren’t packaged as traditional advertising is nothing new. I’ve been doing it online for clients since CompuServe forum days. And print examples of this go back to, at least, the late 1800s (John Deere has published a customer magazine continously for over 100 years). No doubt, as we speak there are being produced custom-produced corporate podcasting…and it will be nothing new, really.

Oh, by the way, if your company needs help figuring out how to do all this, I know just the company for you, but you can also find our “friendly competitors” in directories found here and here.