Twitter, Please Unsuspend Me (Update)

Update: Thanks Twitter for un-suspending me and explaining what happened. (See bottom of post.)

Update 2: August 8, 2019 I have been suspended again. And again for the same reason. Please, Twitter. 

 

Dear Twitter,

For almost a month, you have suspended my one-letter Twitter account, @R .

I have used that Twitter account since 2006 and it has over 18,700 Tweets.

I am certain that no where among those tweets will you find any content that breaks any Twitter rule.

I have another account, @SmallBusiness where I try to help small business owners use Twitter and other technology to support their businesses.

I don’t know what to tell them now. Something like, “You should never use an advertising platform than can arbitrarily suspend you?”

I do appreciate that I can still see my account, even though no one else can.

(If you’ve ever wondered what a suspended account looks like to the person suspended, you can see one on the right.)

For reasons I don’t understand, my appeals have been denied. (Previous suspensions have resulted in apologies from Twitter.)

Other than the broad term “violating Twitter rules,” there has been no specific reasons given for my accounts suspension.

But I can assure you, I’ve never violated any of the broad “rules” reasons

And I can assure you that I have tried every method in your Help Center to reach out to you.

I’ve received only canned responses and a continuation of the suspension.

I can’t reach a Twitter human being to discuss the reason.

I have sent my phone number as part of my appeal, but have not received any calls.

I understand that millions of tweets are posted each hour.

But still.

Your suspended friend,

Rex

Update 2:

Your bots have done it again. Can you please help?

Here’s what you sent me last time.

 

Tweetdecking is Either a New Buzzword or a Doomed One

Tweetdecking, we hardly knew you.

I’ve often said that if you try to game Google for SEO purposes, you are going up against the best engineers in the world. And since the Goose that lays the Golden Google eggs is the quality of search results, anything that is done outside the parameters of what Google approves of is like asking Google to turn you into invisibility.

Twitter seems to be understanding that approach…finally. Seems like they started crushing something called “tweetdecking” over the weekend.

via BuzzFeed:

Tweetdecking, as it’s called, is an explicit violation of Twitter’s spam policy, which does not allow users to “sell, purchase, or attempt to artificially inflate account interactions.”

Still, Twitter has previously struggled to crack down on these accounts.

After a BuzzFeed News story uncovered the practice of tweetdecking in January, Twitter announced new spam-fighting changes to Tweetdeck, including removing the ability to simultaneously retweet a tweet across multiple accounts.

Tweetdecking is over. Our follower gains are gonna diminish,” Andrew Guerrero, a 23-year-old tweetdecker in New Mexico, told BuzzFeed News after Twitter announced the changes in February.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

 

Twitter Swaps the Default Avatar Egg for a Gumdrop

How writing differs from content creating.

Harry McCracken, writing for Fast Company’s Co.Design, goes “Inside Twitter’s Obsessive Quest to Ditch the Egg

Quote:

“Starting today…the egg is history. Twitter is dumping the tarnished icon for a new default profile picture–a blobby silhouette of a person’s head and shoulders, intentionally designed to represent a human without being concrete about gender, race, or any other characteristic. Everyone who’s been an egg until now, whatever their rationale, will automatically switch over.”

I’ve been known to mock coverage of logo redesigns at large technology companies; especially those projects that end up with something looking like clip-art from a stock service. (For instance, that time I explained how Hammock Inc.’s logo was designed.)


In an era when “content creators” are judged by the number of keywords they can pack between commas, it’s nice to read the way Harry demonstrates the craft of writing with both wit and insight.:

Quote:

Instead of defaulting to the perfectly spherical head of a restroom-signage figure, the designers began playing with other approaches. They gravitated toward a gumdrop-like shape and found it had Rorschach Test-like qualities. “The second you start playing with head shape, you start thinking, ‘Oh, this might not just be a single gender,’” says Cotton. “Is that a man with a beard? Is that a woman with a bob?” Rounding off the shoulders, they found, also helped them create a symbol for “human being” that wasn’t freighted with any specific characteristics.

That said, I don’t think this is going to be one of those days that people will recall and feel the need to tell their grandchildren where they were the day they heard the news that Twitter got rid of the egg.

via: Techmeme

 

@NinaTotenberg Re-Tweets

Two following tweets are from NPR’s Supreme Court correspondent @NinaTotenberg about the death of Justice Scalia. Compare specifically how many people re-tweet and like the “tweet about the actual news” vs. “the tweet about what she was doing when she heard the news.”

The fact that NPR listeners have re-tweeted the “news process” story far more than the “news” story mean only one thing about NPR listeners:

1. NPR Listeners are fascinated with the process of journalism exhibited by one of the foremost experts on the Supreme Court.

What I Favor vs. What Twitter Likes

I used to write a lot about Twitter. For example, here is a collection of 10,000+ words I wrote in a series of blog posts called “Thoughts on Twitter.” In brief, all those words say that Twitter was (they were written years ago) great because no two people use it the same way. And anyone who tried to explain how one was supposed to use Twitter broke the first rule of Twitter: You can’t make up rules for how others use Twitter. Back then, Twitter was a feature of a failed product (Odeo) that lived on past the product failure to become an  easy  means to send out a group text message. Back then, the cool things about Twitter were being created by its users. [Most obvious example: @ChrisMesinna  (not the actor) who is responsible for the #hashtag.]

Rather than repeat any more of those 10,000 words, I’ll stop there and say, Twitter is best when you realize it now belongs to someone else, someone who tomorrow could decide that the #hashtag should be a ~tilde or the star should become a heart.

Twitter is now like professional football.  Imagine if all football was eight years ago was (hash)tag football played in a parking lot and today it had to be the NFL, a $billion business that has to make money from huge advertisers and fans who just want to see the game and buy a hot dog.

People say, “professional sports are no longer about the game, they are just part of the entertainment business.” But people who are really fans of a specific sport or team can find a way to peer through the hype and corporate greed and recognize that somewhere buried in all that crap, the game still exists.

Bottomline: Like it, or favorite it, Twitter belongs to the people who own it, not the people who use it. The people who run it will keep trying to “fix” it so the owners will like it. The people who use it will put up with all those useless “fixes” if they can recognize that it’s still tag football under all that crap. If they don’t see the game, they’ll use it to promote what they are doing somewhere else that’s more fun.